The Virginia Quarterly Review

The Virginia Quarterly Review is a magazine focusing on current and historical literary subjects. Since it was founded in 1925, it is produced quarterly. The magazine is published by the Virginia Quarterly Review.Subjects for The Virginia Quarterly Review include literature and literary reviews. The editor is Ted Genoways. Contributing editors are Molly Minturn and Kevin Morrissey

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 4, Autumn

A Kind of Cracker Camelot
The Temple Bombing. By Melissa Fay Greene. Addison-Wesley. $25.00. In her highly acclaimed first book, Praying for Sheetrock, Melissa Fay Greene focused on a little known patch of the large and complex quilt that is the Southern civil rights movement....
Behind the Iron Mask: Joseph Blotner's Warren
BEHIND THE IRON MASK: JOSEPH BLOTNER'S WARREN By Walter Sullivan Robert Penn Warren: A Biography. by Joseph Blotner, Random House. $35.00. Who am I?" Amantha Starr asks herself at the beginning of Band of Angels, and her question reverberates through...
Cinema Lit
Had I decided in my student days to become a gentleman scholar in bow tie and tweed jacket rather than a newspaper reporter in tattered raincoat slogging through the muddy trenches of life, I might have conducted a course in literature. Had I done so,...
Exiles
The storm was bringing the leaves down. They had been coming down all week in swirls and clumps, slicing the air with their brittle tips. Sara watched them fall, heavy with rain. They whirled down out of the sky like drunken birds and slapped against...
Faulkner and Race: Art and Punditry
A curious silence has thus far greeted the centenary of William Faulkner, born in New Albany, Mississippi in the autumn of 1897. By any accounting, he was the most distinguished American storyteller of the century; and it is astonishing still to recall...
In Paradiso, Speriamo Bene
IN PARADISO, SPERIAMO BENE (in memory of Peter Taylor and, once again, of Robert Lowell) 1. Between space, as I often am in dreams, in some precise, geographical wayone unreal street or structure, between two real onesCharlottesville this time, north...
Me and My Enemy
A11 my life perfect strangers have come up and confessed to me. They say I remind them of their sisters, their daughters, their first sweethearts, and it's perfectly true that most of these people have been men and they always confused me by their honesty...
Morphine
Despite tests and retests-her mammogram dittoed across clinic walls like some sick Warhol print-Sarah had not understood her disease until she'd sketched the body it was quickly dismantling. Yet facets of dying remain welcome. There is the peculiar silence....
One Story
ONE STORY It begins in Philadelphia, where the maternity nurse loves the Philadelphia Athletics, who rarely win and will soon move to Kansas City, taking their shortstop who gives C his nickname. Or it begins on a Maryland dairy farm, where mornings...
Personal Politics: American Autobiography
One's-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse.... The Modern Man I sing. Walt Whitman, "One's Self I Sing" We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, the first person that is speaking. H.D. Thoreau,...
Poetry Chronicle
DIFFICULT AND OTHERWISE: NEW WORK BY RUEFLE, YOUNG, AND ALESHIRE BY PETER HARRIS I wanted to write a poem that you would understand For what good is it to me if you can't understand it? But you got to try hard -William Carlos Williams Even before T....
The Birth of Jeeves
Jeeves was conceived and born in New York. At least P.G. Wodehouse was living there when he thought of him. That may sound like an odd place to do it, but the facts are not in dispute. After two discontented years in a London bank and a little journalism,...
The Green Room
"Here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal." Of all the writers to come out of "the Southern Renaissance" in the early part of this century, William Faulkner stands as first and foremost, even though many of his works were out of print at...
The Influence of Affluence
Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria after the Second World War. By Reinhold Wagnleitner, translated by Diana M. Wolf North Carolina. $55 cloth, $24.95 paper. Bronx Man Leads Russian Revolution" announced...
The Last Train from Victoria Falls
Paul Theroux is my favorite travel writer. He goes places that I imagine going to-remote, alien places such as Mongolia or Sri Lanka or John O'Groats-but don't really want to visit. He is an intrepid traveler; I am closer to the Accidental Tourist. He...
The Man Who Desired Certainty
THE MAN WHO DESIRED CERTAINTY by THOMAS FILBIN Bertrand Russell; The Spirit of Solitude 1872-1921. By Ray Monk. The Free Press. $3500 When Bertrand Russell was 11, his brother Frank decided to teach him Euclid's geometry. He was later to recall, "I had...
The Nests of Hummingbirds
Jeremy Bockman sat in the rare book room of the university library, poring over Birds of America. He had written a report on John James Audubon for his fifth-grade art class the previous year, and, in the course of researching the report, had surprised...
The Valiant Virginians
Talk About Trouble: A New Deal Portrait of Virginians in the Great Depression. Edited by Nancy J. Martin-Perdue and Charles L. Perdue, Jr. North Carolina. $45.00 cloth; $19.95 paper. Eudora Ramsay Richardson would love this book. Richardson was the state...
What the Sixties Was, and Is
Reassessing the Sixties: Debating the Political and Cultural Legacy. Edited by Stephen Macedo. Foreword by George F. Will. Afterword by Todd Gitlin. Norton. $25.00. Almost nothing about the cultural marker known as "the sixties" seems especially clear,...