The Virginia Quarterly Review

The Virginia Quarterly Review is a magazine focusing on current and historical literary subjects. Since it was founded in 1925, it is produced quarterly. The magazine is published by the Virginia Quarterly Review.Subjects for The Virginia Quarterly Review include literature and literary reviews. The editor is Ted Genoways. Contributing editors are Molly Minturn and Kevin Morrissey

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 2, Spring

A Bitter Peace: Washington, Hanoi, and the Making of the Paris Agreement
A Bitter Peace: Washington, Hanoi, and the Making of the Paris Agreement, by Pierre Asselin. It should not come as a surprise that the agreed framework that permitted the extrication of the U.S. from the war in Vietnam turned out to be anything but a...
A Community Built on Words: The Constitution in History and Politics
A Community Built on Words: The Constitution in History and Politics, by H. Jefferson Powell. The Constitution is not an apolitical text; rather, from its beginning it has been more like a contested battlefield over which rival interpretations struggled....
A Conservative Revolutionary: Emmeline Pankhurst (1857-1928)
"I say with no fear of contradiction that whatever view posterity may take, Mrs. Pankhurst has won for herself a niche in the Temple of Fame which will last for all time."-Stanley Baldwin speaking on March 6, 1930 to the thousands present at the unveiling...
An Author for All Seasons
Going to See the Elephant: Pieces of a Writing Life. By George Garrett. Edited by Jeb Livingood. Texas Review Press. $18.95 paper. George Garrett's writing can't be categorized. The range of subjects, styles and interests in his novels, stories, essays,...
Buenos Aires Side to Side
Faye's daughter never cries except when they say goodbye on Sundays. Then the big tears come. Then, Lord, the whole pampas reel, and the asphalt and the airplanes, and the red dust quakes with her crying. She cries then like clockwork, the moment her...
Diaspora in Antiquity
Diaspora: Jews Amidst Greeks and Romans. By Erich Gruen. Harvard University Press. $39.95 There are two delightful and unexpected chapters in Erich Gruen's Diaspora, which deals with the mindset and the social condition of the Jews who dwelt outside...
From South-Watching to America-Watching
FROM SOUTH-WATCHING TO AMERICA-WATCHING By BY FRED AM Gerald W. Johnson: From Southern Liberal to National Conscience. By Vincent Fitzpatrick. Louisiana State University Press. $39.95. Journalist H. L. Mencken called Gerald W. Johnson "the best editorial...
From the Great Plains to L.A.: The Intersecting Paths of Lawrence Welk and Johnny Carson
As the popular host of the "Tonight" show for nearly 30 years and Hollywood's most powerful icon until his retirement in 1992, Johnny Carson stands as a significant cultural indicator of late 20th-century America. Born almost a quarter of a century earlier...
Her Father's Voice
"Silka says that if more people on this beautiful earth believed in God they would have more respect for one another and our natural resources. That the thousand lakes of Finland wouldn't be so polluted, songbirds wouldn't be disappearing, and so many...
Ignorance
Ignorance, by Milan Kundera, translated from the French by Linda Asher. According to Milan Kundera, author of The Book of Laughter and Forgetting and The Unbearable Lightness of Being, "a novel does not assert anything, a novel searches and poses questions."...
Lee's Men in Gray and Glory
LEE'S MEN IN GRAY AND GLORY By GEORGE GARRETT `Damage Them All You Can:' Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, by George Walsh. Tom Doherty Associates. $24.95 "It don't hurt a bit to be shot in a wooden leg." -Lt. Gen Richard S. Ewell, CSA It's...
Nuns
There was a middle aged nun on our ship, a square built woman in a brown habit. She had a round, pink face, earnestly scrubbed, and moist eyes that gleamed with selfsatisfaction through rimless glasses. We were sitting next to her at lunch one day when...
Only the Sky
1 It was early. Many were barefoot. Some stole clogs from doorsteps and bolted, as if staying in motion could keep them alive at ground zero. Hiroshima blistered at sea level. It was the Catholic feast of Jesus glorified on Mt. Tabor, Luke writes the...
Polio Summer
I grew up listening to stories. Our family seemed to live on them. I picture us around a table. We are slightly hunched, with our arms forward, as if we're ready to work. We think we are at work. We're working in a family business. We are in the business...
Postcolonial Studies and the Genre of Poetry
The Hybrid Muse: Postcolonial Poetry in English. By Jahan Ramazani. University Chicago Press, 2001. $17.50 paper. In the introduction to The Hybrid Muse, Jahan Ramazani points out the "relative neglect" of poetry in criticism of postcolonial literatures....
Red Wings over the Yalu: China, the Soviet Union, and the Air War in Korea
Red Wings Over the Yalu: China, the Soviet Union, and the Air War in Korea, by Xiaoming Zhang. Despite the popular notion that for the United States the Korean War is the "Forgotten War," a vast body of literature exists which covers nearly all elements...
The Conquerors: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1941-1945
The Conquerors: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1941-1945, by Michael Beschloss. Whether a particular war is just or otherwise, warfare is an ethical domain fraught with challenges that are vexing and chilling. And, when the...
The Fredericksburg Campaign: Winter War on the Rappahannock
The Fredericksburg Campaign: Winter War on the Rappahannock, by Francis Augustin O'Reilly. No modern scholar of the Civil War had studied the military aspects of the Fredericksburg campaign in rigorous detail until Francis O'Reilly, and his book will...
The Gospel of Mark Schneider
On Laura's first day at the Purdue Entomology lab, while counting white larvae floating in glass vials, Mark asked her if she was gay, and she said yes. Based on her first ten minutes of observing him, she'd thought he was a cocky asshole. She liked...
The Green Room
"Here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal." American higher education, as JAMES AXTELL notes at the opening of his essay, has been called "the envy of the planet." Yet, beginning in the late 1980's, America's colleges and universities particularly...
The Immortal Dinner: A Famous Evening of Genius and Laughter in Literary London, 1817
The Immortal Dinner: A Famous Evening of Genius and Laughter in Literary London, 1817, by Penelope Hughes-Hallett. Henry Adams captured the essence of the 11th-century Norman age in a celebrated description of a dinner that William soon-to-be Conqueror...
The Judgement of Paris
From where Charles Graves sat, several rows back and to the left among the other fourth year cadets in Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hall, Colonel Jefferson Randolph Kean's uniform, as he walked to the podium, seemed to have been fitted before its owner...
The Making of a Poet
The Blessing: A Memoir. By Gregory Orr. Council Oak Pub. $24.95 How does one live down- or rather, live through-the killing of a brother? As a boy of 12, Gregory Orr shot his brother Peter in a deer-hunting accident only to learn, immediately after,...
The New Look-And Taste-Of British Cuisine
In the summer of 1997 readers of the serious-minded British newspaper The Guardian were startled to find a front-page story about a new, ultra-chic London restaurant that had taken delivery of chips, (aka pommes frites, French fries) from the delivery...
The New Minstreldom, or Why So Much in Contemporary Black Culture Went Wrong
Blame Thomas Dartmouth Rice, if you must, because he is given credit for "corking up" and introducing a song-and-- dance act called Jim Crow. The year was 1828, long before "Jim Crow" became associated with laws and customs designed to keep freed slaves...
The Pursuit of Oblivion: A Global History of Narcotics
The Pursuit of Oblivion: A Global History of Narcotics, by Richard Davenport-Hines. Although described several times by the author as a history of narcotics (by which term he includes not only opiates, but stimulants like cocaine, hallucinogens like...
Walt's Adoptive Family
after Logan Pearsall Smith's Unforgotten Years & Alan Armstrong's Off In Zora Even the Quakers had heard of Walt Whitman, and since the ban on women at the college was now removed, it was his sister, home on vacation, who told Logan Pearsall Smith...
What's Wrong-And Right-With American Higher Education?
It's been said recently, by a close student of the subject, that higher education in the United States is "the envy of the planet." But to the chorus of critics who have voiced their complaints over the past 10 or 15 years, such a claim would appear...
'World's Zaniest Newspaper': The Short, Happy Life of the Paris Edition
Jake Barnes' work in Paris is newspaper work, though we only glimpse him at it-reading French morning papers, writing stories to be sent out by weekly mail, attending a briefing at the Quai d'Orsay-before he is off for the Lost-Generation escapades in...