ASEE Prism

ASEE Prism is the flagship publication of the American Society for Engineering Education. ASEE Prism provides coverage and analysis of higher education in the engineering field.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 3, November

Allergy-Free Cats
Can science help create the pur-r-r-rfect cat? Well cat fanciers might argue that our feline friends can't be improved upon. But for 27.5 million Americans, cats are a source of real discomfort: itchy eyes, sneezing, and wheezing. That's because they're...
A Race in the Sun
ON CAMPUS During the American Solar Challenge race last summer, students found themselves yelling at enthusiastic supporters to "Please stand back!" It wasn't that they lacked an appreciation for their audience. But if too many people started to crowd...
Fashion with Shock Appeal
Electronically-enabled clothing has been speculated about in the technology and fashion media ever since comic spymeister Maxwell Smart chatted into his shoe-phone. But so-called wearware has been rare-rare on store shelves. A year ago, jeansmaker Levi...
Improving with Age
TEACHING TOOLBOX University administrators are figuring out how to balance the benefits of experience provided by older faculty members with the occasional need to help them remain innovative in the classroom. As the leaves turn to autumn colors across...
Innovations in Engineering
The United States has over 300 engineering colleges, each with its own financial resources, graduate-employer base, and student body. The advent of the EC2000 accreditation process requires each college to assess its resources and opportunities and identify...
Making Every Vote Count
After the debacle of last year's presidential election, which was turned into a weeks-- long cliffhanger because of confusing or soiled ballots, there has been bipartisan agreement that perhaps America's electoral system needs a high-tech fix. But a...
Mastery Learning
TEACHING TOOLBOX TEACHING TEACHING METHODS COME AND GO BUT THIS ONE MAY BE HERE TO STAY. The "hot" engineering teaching method in the 1970s was the Personalized System of Instruction, which is a form of "mastery learning." Students studied material,...
Onward but Perhaps Not Upward
REFRACTIONS Two different attack sites in two different cities-one with its buildings arranged vertically, in celebration of America's towering supremacy, the other horizontally, crouched symbolically in defense-have posed two very different challenges...
Open University
MIT is known worldwide as an incubator of eggheads, an insular realm inhabited by pale men and women with pocket protectors who are so enchanted by transistors and algorithmsand the musings of their own big brains-that they're oblivious to the world...
Role Model for Diversity
John Slaughter has always worked hard to attract more minorities to engineering. Now as president of NACME he's in a position to make a real difference. In Topeka, Kansas, where John Brooks Slaughter grew up, most people thought that a person who worked...
Surprising Shift in Student Aid
As every alumnus knows, the ol' alma mater counts heavily on their generosity to help fund such things as expansions, projects, and scholarships. And in gratitude for the institution's help in launching their careers, many grads gladly write out checks...
Take Me, Take My Spouse
Fortunately for married academicians-and others in long-term relationships-a growing number of colleges and universities are addressing the dilemma of the dual career couple. After months of an intensive search, you've finally identified the perfect...
The Media Is the Message
LAST WORD I would in one fell swoop reach out to more young men and women than I would over the rest of my academic career. Last May, I was invited to be a judge for the cable television show "Junkyard Wars," sponsored by The Learning Channel. "Junkyard...
Tight-Lipped Labs
TEACHING TOOLBOX RESEARCH FEDERAL REGULATIONS GOVERN MORE OF WHAT WE DISCLOSE TO COLLEAGUES AND STUDENTS We all know that publication of engineering and computer science research in peer-reviewed journals is the hallmark of a successful academic program....
Trouble in High-Tech Land
We've all heard of Murphy's Law, which posits that whatever can go wrong will go wrong. That would seem to be the point of a recently published book by technology writer James R. Chiles, Inviting Disaster: Lessons from the Edge of Technology (Harper...
Wanted: Third-Class Ticket Holders
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE I remember reading an article a few years ago that was written for a fraternity. The article was entitled, "Excuse Me, Are You Holding a Third-- Class Ticket?" Since the article could apply to any volunteer organization, I couldn't...
Whirling about in Class
It's the last day of class, and Pablo Iglesias' students are facing a test that will determine 30 percent of their grades-the model helicopter test. Iglesias, 37, teaches Control Systems Design, a class for engineering students at Johns Hopkins University....