Academe

Academe is the bimonthly magazine of the American Association of University Professors. Academe features analysis of higher education issues from the perspective of faculty members, including news affecting professors and feature articles on tenure, affirmative action, part-time faculty appointments, intellectual property, and a host of other timely academic issues.

Articles from Vol. 91, No. 1, January/February

AAUP Chapter Crafts Retirement Plan
The administration of Marymount Manhattan College caught faculty by surprise when it announced the institution's first-ever retirement-incentive plan in July 2003. The faculty had wanted a formal policy to replace the college's practice of negotiating...
AAUP Election Bylaws
Adopted by Council November 1979; amended by Council November 1982, June 1984, November 1984, November 1985, June 1988, June 1991, November 1992, June 1994, November 1995, June 2003, and November 2004.These bylaws, which may from time to time be revised...
Academic Freedom and Electronic Communications
This report was prepared by a subcommittee of the Association's Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure and initially published in 1997, A revised text was approved by Committee A and adopted by the Association's Council in November 2004.The advent...
Academic Freedom and Tenure: Benedict College (South Carolina): A Supplementary Report on a Censured Administration1
This report concerns actions in summer 2004 by President David H. Swinton of Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina, to dismiss Professors Milwood Motley and Larry Williams for having refused to grade students in their courses in accordance with...
"Believing in Yourself" as Classroom Culture
When everyone is right and no one is wrong, what happens to the authority of expertise?When I was a college student in the early to mid-1960s, I decided to become a college professor because my own teachers excited an intellectual respect unequalled...
Censured Administrations
Investigations by the American Association of University Professors of the administrations of the institutions listed below show that, as evidenced by a past violation, they are not observing the generally recognized principles of academic freedom and...
Classroom Cultures
Teaching remains the most private of our professional activities. Scholarship is peer reviewed and often develops in public venues like conferences. Professional and institutional service requires debate and action in meetings and faculty senates. In...
Corporate Sponsorship Problematic, Review Finds
An external review of a controversial five-year $25 million corporate sponsorship agreement between the University of California, Berkeley, and a biotechnology company found that universities should avoid such arrangements. The review, which was conducted...
Courts Find Discrimination
In July, a California trial court jury found that the School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, violated state laws by discriminating against former instructor Janet Conney on the basis of her sex, and it ordered the UC system...
Dangerous Art
Karl Marx agreed with Hegel's notion that great events and personalities in history reappear in one fashion or another, but Marx added that they appear the first time as tragedy, the second as farce. The transition from tragedy to farce, however, is...
Enrollment of Foreign Students Declines
Fewer international students are enrolling in U.S. colleges and universities, according to three reports issued last fall. Open Doors, an annual report of the Institute of International Higher Education, announced a 2.4 percent enrollment decrease in...
Ensuring the Nation's Future: Preserving the Promise of Higher Education
The following report was prepared by the Task Force on State Budget Issues, a subcommittee of the Association's Committee on Government Relations, for use in state conference lobbying campaigns. The full committee approved the report for publication...
Extreme Academia
When it comes to new programming, academia offers a gold mine for Hollywood producers.Inspired by the charismatic magnetism of the Professors Heinz on PBS's Colonial House, networks have realized that academics are a huge untapped resource for the world...
Funding Academic Freedom
Academic freedom is not free. What does this cliche mean? Recently, two faculty members at Benedict College in South Carolina challenged a new grading policy imposed by the college president and were dismissed for "insubordination." They dared to question...
Letters
Letters to Academe of three hundred words or fewer are encouraged. Academe reserves the right to edit letters. Submit them by mail to the AAUP or by e-mail to aeademe@aaup.org. Submissions must include the writer's name and phone number.Accreditors As...
Muslim Scholar Barred from U.S. Academic Post
The U.S. Department of State in August revoked the work visa of Tariq Ramadan, a citizen of Switzerland and well-known Muslim scholar who was appointed to a named professorship at the University of Notre Dame to begin with the fall 2004 semester. The...
On Professors Assigning Their Own Texts to Students
The following statement was approved for publication by the Association's Committee on Professional Ethics in November 2004. Comments are welcome and should be addressed to the Association's Washington office.Professors have long assigned to their students...
Outlook for the Coming Year
In addition to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA), the new Congress will deal with a number of issues that threaten academic freedom. Proponents of a stronger USA Patriot Act will point to election results to bolster their case, and...
Personal Philosophies of Teaching: A False Promise?
Self-reflectiveness makes professors better. Sometimes, however, statements of teaching philosophy make better boxes than ladders.Increasingly, college and university faculty are asked to articulate their personal philosophies of teaching when they are...
Professors of Practice
The statement that follows, prepared by a subcommittee of the Association's Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure, was approved for publication by Committee A in November 2004. Comments are welcome and should be addressed to the Association's Washington...
Record of the Council November 13-14, 2004
The Council of the Association met on November 13 and 14, 2004, at the Westin Embassy Row Hotel in Washington, D.C.President Jane Buck presided. Members of the Council (with the exceptions of Patrick Cihon and Rodger Govea) were present, as were the...
Speaking Truth to Power: An Interview with Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe, the Nigerian novelist and poet-and AAUP member-reflects on freedom, political oppression, and higher education.AAUP general secretary Roger Bowen traveled to Bard College on November 11 to interview Chinm Achebe, who is Charles P. Stevenson,...
Standing Rules Governing the Annual Meeting
Regulations governing the Association's annual meeting were first formulated by the Council and the annual meeting in 1957, The regulations were last amended in November 2000.I. ProgramPursuant to its responsibility under Article IV of the Constitution...
The Academic Elite Goes to Washington, and to War
Critics of the academy have lambasted faculty doves, History shows that academia has roosted a flock of hawks.It has become part of the conventional wisdom that a decidedly left-wing slant influences what students are taught at elite colleges and universities...
The Future of the AAUP
At the December 30, 2003, annual meeting of the Modern Language Association there was, I was happy to see, a session scheduled on the impact of September 11 on higher education. I was less pleased when it turned out none of the distinguished speakers...
The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail/The Innovator's Solution: Creating and Sustaining Successful Growth
The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to FailClayton M. Christensen. Boston: Harvard Graduate School of Business Press, 1997The Innovator's Solution: Creating and Sustaining Successful GrowthClayton M. Christensen and Michael...
The Two-Body Problem: Dual-Career-Couple Hiring Practices in Higher Education
The Two-Body Problem: Dual-Career-Couple Hiring Practices in Higher EducationBy Lisa Wolf-Wendel, Susan B. Twombly, and Suzanne Rice. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003In The Two-Body Problem: Dual-Career-Couple Hiring Practices in-Higher...
University Administrators Bar Speakers
Administrators at three universities canceled or postponed the speaking engagements of prominent liberals in the months leading up to last fall's elections. Officials at George Mason University and California State University-San Marcos canceled scheduled...
University Will Allow NAACP Chapter
The Catholic University of America has reversed its earlier decision to ban the formation of a campus chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Last April, the university administration rejected a proposal by...
U.S. Government Restricts Travel to Cuba
Shortly before the November 2 presidential election, the U.S. Department of State denied visas to all sixty-five Cuban scholars scheduled to participate in an international academic conference in Las Vegas. The State Department gave as its reason for...
Wedging Creationism into the Academy
Proponents of a controversial theory struggle to gain purchase within academia. A case study of the quest for academic legitimacy.In 1999, William Dembski became director of the newly established Michael Polanyi Center at Baylor University, thanks to...
Why "Active Learning" Can Be Perilous to the Profession
Faculty and administrators are paying new attention to student learning, sometimes for the wrong reasons.You've probably heard the terms "active" or "engaged" learning at your college. If you haven't encountered them yet, beware. Worry especially if...