Violence and Victims

Violence and Victims is a magazine focusing on Social Sciences

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 4, August

A Comparison of Methods for Collecting Self-Report Data on Sensitive Topics
Insufficient attention has been paid to whether disclosure rates of sensitive or stigmatizing information vary as a function of method of inquiry. Methods vary both in terms of the anonymity afforded the participant and the opportunity to make a connection...
Does Questionnaire Format Impact Reported Partner Violence Rates?: An Experimental Study
Researchers assess partner violence using numerous formats, but whether questionnaire format affects obtained rates has rarely been examined. We compared paper-and-pencil versus computer administrations, and standard Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2)...
Effects of Method on Participants and Disclosure Rates in Research on Sensitive Topics
This study replicates and extends the research of Rosenbaum, Rabenhorst, Reddy, Fleming, and Howells, which also appears in this special issue. Responses from 398 randomly assigned participants regarding differentially sensitive topics were collected...
How Do I Tell Thee? Voice, Pen, or Computer Key
In this issue, the previous two articles by Hamby and colleagues and Vega and O'Leary are concerned with whether the method of administration and format of the Conflict Tactics Scale influence participant responses. Because they examine different aspects...
Meta-Research on Violence and Victims: The Impact of Data Collection Methods on Findings and Participants
In keeping with conventions regarding the use of the prefix meta-, as in meta-cognition or meta-linguistic, the theme of this special issue is best captured by the term mta-research, or research that explicates the research process. More specifically,...
Participant Responses to Retrospective Surveys of Child Maltreatment: Does Mode of Assessment Matter?
This study examines the impact that different methods of assessing child maltreatment history may have on adult participants. A total of 334 female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to complete a retrospective measure of child sexual and...
Reaction Time and Item Presentation Factors in the Self-Report of Partner Aggression
The Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS) have used different formats intended to maximize the accuracy and disclosure of relationship aggression. The original CTS presented items in a hierarchical order, seeking to establish a "context of legitimation." The...
Sensitive Research with Adolescents: Just How Upsetting Are Self-Report Surveys Anyway?
Distress related to answering personal survey questions about drug use, suicidal behavior, and physical and sexual abuse were examined in multiple convenience samples of adolescents. Samples varied in consent procedures utilized (active vs. passive parental...
Sexual Assault Survivors' Reactions to a Thought Suppression Paradigm
Trauma survivors may experience harm from participating in research on sensitive topics. The current study assessed reactions of sexual assault survivors with and without symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following an experimental...
Telephone Survey Respondents' Reactions to Questions regarding Interpersonal Violence
Concerns have been raised regarding the appropriateness of asking about violence victimization in telephone interviews and whether asking such questions increases respondents' distress or risk for harm. However, no large-scale studies have evaluated...
The Risk of Partner Aggression Research: Impact of Laboratory Couples Conflict Protocols on Participants
The impact of male-to-female intimate partner violence (IPV) research on participants is unknown. A measure of impact was given to participants in an IPV study to assess systematically the impact of completing questionnaires, engaging in conflict conversations,...