Aging Today

Aging Today is the bimonthly newspaper published by the American Society on Aging. Aging Today covers developments in public policy, research, practice, media, and programming in the field of again. Each issue includes four pages devoted to in-depth coverage of a single issue.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 5, September/October

15 Win 2007 Purpose Prize
A 60-year-old physician in Massachusetts who set out to save 100,000 lives unnecessarily lost in hospitals, a 91-year-old former businessman in Arizona who created an arts curriculum to sharpen critical thinking among schoolchildren, and a Missouri nurse...
Elderhood Reborn: Envisioning a Life beyond Adulthood
What Are Old People For? How Elders Will Save the World, the provocative meditation on the essence of elderhood by William H. Thomas, creator of the Eden Alternative and Green House program to change the culture of nursing home care, was recently published...
Elite Care Brings Elder-Friendly Technology to Oregon
Maria has been diagnosed with dementia, but one wouldn't know it from visiting with her. She's quite comfortable in her environment, enjoys friendships with other residents and staff members, and helps daily around her household. Maria is doing well...
Five Brain-Health Factors
Five factors are critical for optimizing brain health. These include:Socialization: People should try to stay connected to their communities and involved with others in a personally meaningful ways. Studies indicate that those who are isolated and segregated...
Happenings
Mark your calendar: October is IUk About Prescriptions Month. Contact: National Council on Patient information and Education, Bethesdq, Md., (301) 656-8565; e-mail: ncpie@ncpie.info; websites: www.talkaboutrx.org. Check out their new Medication Use Safety...
Haven Hospice Transitions
"How do you provide a support group to people who don't respond to the touchy-feely sound of 'support group'?" wondered Nancy Dohn, coordinator of the Transitions Program at Haven Hospice in Gainesville, Fla. That question has nettled many healthcare...
How to Improve Nursing Homes-One Expert's 30-Year View
When this editor was starting to cover issues in healthcare and aging in 1982, one of the first lecturers I heard on long-term care policy was Charlene Harrington, who was as sharp-minded as the RN and PhD on her business card might suggest. Today, Harrington...
Intel Puts Ethnographic Team Inside
As researchers and advocates raise alarms about American society's lack of readiness to care for its aging population, technology companies see an opportunity to help, by providing ways of enabling people to remain independent and healthy. Such is the...
Living Laboratory Tests New Models of Home Assessment
Aging in place is hardly a new concept to the field of aging, and for good reason: Most people wish to live in their own homes and communities as they age. However, achieving this goal remains a challenge, especially because of the common accrual of...
New Book on Memory Loss Gives Voice to Worried Boomers
NEW BOOK ON MEMORY LOSS GIVES VOICE TO WORRIED BOOMERSFor most of her life, Cathryn Jakobson Ramin took her brain for granted: It served her well in her active life as a journalist and parent. Then, as she set a big toe into middle age, she couldn't...
Report Debunks Myths of Elders' High Costs of Care
Public policy professionals in aging have rolled their eyes at the claims for years: Rapid population aging is driving Healthcare costs in the United States to unsustainable levels, with aggressive, high-tech, care for elders at the end of life the main...
Report Exposes Nursing Home Segregation
A new study shows that poorer quality of nursing home care in the United States is linked to racial segregation. The report, "Separate and Unequal: Racial Segregation and Disparities in Quality Across U.S. Nursing Homes," published in Health Affairs,...
Social Security: Ideas for a New President
You don't hear much about Social Security these days except in an occasional story about a stolen laptop containing people's Social Security numbers. When a rare dispatch on the subject comes, it's from one of the legion of presidential hopefuls, who...
Study: Caregiving Damages Cells
Recent research from the National Institute on Aging and Ohio State University (OSU) adds to the growing epidemiological evidence that stressed caregivers die sooner than people who do not take on that role. "Now we have a good biological reason for...
Technology and the Age Boom
The late social critic Betty Friedan once said, "Aging is not 'lost youth' but a new stage of opportunity and strength." Today's information age changes at a hectic pace, especially as modern society moves into an always-on state of connectivity. As...
The Human Brain: A New Frontier for Healthy Lifestyles
Clinical neuropsychologist Paul D. Nussbaum was honored with the American Society on Aging's 2007 Gloria Cavanaugh Award at the recent Joint Conference of ASA and the National Council on Aging. The following article is based on the award lecture he presented...
Trends in 2008 Conference Program Reflect Changing Field
For half a century, the American Society on Aging (ASA) has developed education and training programs to provide information on innovative ideas and promising practices to professionals serving older adults. A quick review of submissions fof Aging in...
Will Shift to 'Successful Aging' Include Low-Income Elders?
Should older adults be encouraged to work longer or to retire? If they are to transition more gradually from work to retirement than past elders, how can their economic well-being be ensured? If Americans desire greater flexibility or fluidity in work,...
Yoga, Elder Abuse and Hospice Programs Win Asa Awards
"While yoga has become an integral part of physical activities in mainstream America, it has not reached the low-income, underserved and economically disadvantaged seniors who need it most," said Frank Iszak, .executive director of the nonprofit Silver...