Law & Society Review

Law & Society Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 3, 2018

Are Women Getting (More) Justice? Malaysia's Sharia Courts in Ethnographic and Historical Perspective
[A] history of family law, written from an anthropological perspective, is a history of narrative strategies engaged in by the state to influence the life course of its nationals. These maneuvers ultimately aim to fix the meaning of kin relations essential...
China and Islam: The Prophet, the Party, and the Law
China and Islam: The Prophet, the Party, and the Law. By Matthew S. Erie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016.Among the many qualities and contributions of Matthew Erie's rich monograph on Islam, law, and legal practice in China, one of the most...
Crack as Proxy: Aggressive Federal Drug Prosecutions and the Production of Black–White Racial Inequality
Crack cocaine first appeared in the major urban areas of New York, Miami, San Diego, and Los Angeles in the early 1980s, setting in motion a wave of new legislation and law enforcement practices that spread throughout the nation (Fagan and Chin 1989)....
Editors' Note
As editors of the Law and Society Review, we have had a number of inquiries about possibilities for special issues. All were great suggestions, based on diverse and engaging ranges of scholarship and scholars. Uncomfortable with an ad hoc process, we...
Law and Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism after the Arab Spring
Law and Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring. By Nimer Sultany. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017.It is hard to be too effusive in one's praise for this book. It is groundbreaking for several reasons: first, it removes...
Law and Society Review Special Issue Introduction: Islamic Law, Society, and the State
Islamic law occupies a relatively minor place in the legal systems of most Muslim-majority countries, with jurisdiction often limited to matters of family law. In a smaller number of countries, its reach includes criminal and constitutional matters as...
Law, the State, and Public Order: Regulating Religion in Contemporary Egypt
A strikingly tall talkative man in his early sixties, Maher al-Gohary, nervously wiped the rim of his soda can before popping the lid. Al-Gohary is one of two Muslim-born Egyptians who raised administrative suits seeking legal conversion to Coptic Orthodoxy;...
"Legality with a Vengeance": Reclaiming Distribution for Sociolegal Studies
The law and society community has argued for decades for an expansive understanding of what counts as "law." They have studied informal systems of normative ordering alongside formal or official law (Engel 1980, 1984; Greenhouse 1986; Merry 1988). They...
Muslim Women's Quest for Justice: Gender, Law and Activism in India
Muslim Women's Quest for Justice: Gender, Law and Activism in India. By Mengia Hong-Tschalaer. New Delhi: Cambridge University Press, 2017.Reviewed by Kalindi Kokal, Department of Law and Anthropology, Max Plank Institute of Social Anthropology, Halle...
Pop-Up Property: Enacting Ownership from San Francisco to Sydney
Private claims over public streets have long histories. Such claims are often rejected, with officials and/or members of the local community acting to enforce the public nature of the street. The parking of camper vans in kerbside spaces by backpackers...
Religion, Law and Intolerance in Indonesia
Religion, Law and Intolerance in Indonesia. By Tim Lindsey, Helen Pausacker. London and New York: Routledge, 2016.Reviewed by Stijn C van Huis, Consultant Indonesian Law and Society, Specialist Indonesian Islamic family law, Indonesia, The NetherlandsLindsey...
Seeing like an Islamic State: Shari'a and Political Power in Sudan
What does it mean to see like an Islamic state? In his influential work, Seeing Like a State, James Scott (1998) argues that the modern state acquires its distinctive form of power by rendering social life legible-that is, standardized, abstract, and...
Sharia Courts and Muslim Personal Law in India: Intersecting Legal Regimes
I n July 2005, a Delhi lawyer filed suit with the Supreme Court of India seeking to ban "sharia courts" (dar ul qazas) and Islamic legal opinions (fatwas) throughout India (Vishwa Lochan Madan v. Union of India 2005, Petition: 45-47).1 The suit alleged...
Shari'ah on Trial: Northern Nigeria's Islamic Revolution
Shari'ah On Trial: Northern Nigeria's Islamic Revolution. By Sarah Eltantawi, Oakland: University of California Press, 2017.More than a decade before the Arab Spring, another revolution was taking shape: an Islamic legal revolution in West Africa. It...
The Judicialization of Religion
Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, one Muslim-majority country after another adopted constitutional provisions meant to incorporate Islam into the legal order. The Malaysian Constitution declares that "Islam is the religion of the Federation..."1...
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