The Hemingway Review

The Hemingway Review is a semiannual scholarly journal devoted to the life and work of Ernest Hemingway. The Hemingway Review includes feature length articles, book reviews, library information, and current bibliography.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 1, Fall

Acknowledgments
With two special issues celebrating the 1999 Hemingway centennial, it's been far too long since we took space to acknowledge the many scholars who have contributed their valuable time and special expertise to The Hemingway Review. The following individuals...
Biblio-Files: Notions from a Decade of Annotation
Bibliography isn't what it used to be, and to contemplate the problems and possibilities that a bibliographer faces today is in large part to reckon how technology makes the task more or less possible, more or less reliable. This essay addresses three...
Bulletin Board
[Don't let your Hemingway event go unpublicized! Please send news of interest to Hemingway scholars to Susan F. Beegel, Editor, THE HEMINGWAY REVIEW, 180 Polpis Road, Nantucket, MA 02554, Fax: (508) 325-7157 and E-mail: sbeegel@aol.com, and to Charles...
Cold War Revisions of Hemingway's Men at War (1)
In 1942, Hemingway edited and introduced a large anthology, Men at War: The Best War Stories of All Time, a book he hoped would aid the fight against Fascism. By the time the book was reprinted in 1955, however, the former Axis powers had become U.S....
Cold War Revisions of Hemingway's Men at War (2)
In other words, winning the war against Fascism, for Hemingway, was the over-riding priority. It was more important than publishing magnificent (if perhaps less than truthful) writing like Malraux's, and it was more important than publishing morally...
Current Bibliography: Annotated (1)
[HEMINGWAY REVIEW bibliographer Al DeFazio welcomes your assistance in keeping this feature up-to-date. Please send reprints, clippings, and photocopies of articles, as well as notices of new books, directly to him at 1837 Satinwood Court, Vienna,...
Current Bibliography: Annotated (2)
--. "Hemingway's Search for Identity--from The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls, to The Garden of Eden." West Bengal: A West Bengal Government English Fortnightly 41.23 (1999): 157+. Neel, Hildy Coleman. "The War Monument...
Dedication
This issue of The Hemingway Review is dedicated to the memory of Michael S. Reynolds, Professor of English and Associate Dean at North Carolina State University. His supreme achievement in Hemingway studies needs no introduction--a five volume, definitive...
"Enough of a Bad Gamble": Correcting the Misinformation on Hemingway's Captain James Gamble
Scholars and biographers continue to perpetuate three canards about Hemingway's World War I friend Captain James Gamble: that he came from Cincinnati, that his wealth was from the Procter & Gamble Company, and that he was homosexual. In fact he...
Garnering an Opinion: A Double Look at Nick's Surrogate Mother and Her Relationship to Dr. Adams in Hemingway's "Ten Little Indians" (1)
The character of Mrs. Garner in "Ten Indians" has been interpreted as nurturing and benevolent, even simple. Yet Mrs. Garner's malice towards Carl, her fascination with Indians, and her attitude towards the boys all complicate her character. Her parenting...
Garnering an Opinion: A Double Look at Nick's Surrogate Mother and Her Relationship to Dr. Adams in Hemingway's "Ten Little Indians" (2)
Earlier manuscripts of "Ten Indians" also hint that Dr. Adams feels protective of his son, and is beset with guilt after he's told Nick about Prudie's infidelity. In a late draft of the story, the "Madrid" version, a deeply conflicted Dr. Adams prays,...
Indians, Woodcraft, and the Construction of White Masculinity: The Boyhood of Nick Adams (1)
Given Hemingway's personal interest in Ernest Thompson Seton's writing, and his familiarity with the tenets of Seton's hugely popular youth organization, the Woodcraft Indians, it is not surprising that the Nick Adams stories frame the discourse of...
Indians, Woodcraft, and the Construction of White Masculinity: The Boyhood of Nick Adams (2)
Inside, there seems to be more concern with the business of medicine than with healing. The voice that speaks first is not the doctor's but his wife's. Her question--"`Aren't, you going back to work, dear?'"--serves as a subtle reminder of the Protestant...
News from the Hemingway Collection
IN MEMORIAM MICHAEL REYNOLDS The influence of Michael Reynolds on Hemingway studies is incalculable and the whole field of literary scholarship will be much the poorer for the loss of him. Here at the Hemingway Collection we wish to recognize our...
Shadows of a Literary Dialect: For Whom the Bell Tolls in Five Romance Languages (1)
Sixty years after publication, For Whom the Bell Tolls remains an admirable stylistic experiment in which Hemingway manipulates Spanish and English syntax and vocabulary to convey the impression that the characters are speaking Spanish. The result...
Shadows of a Literary Dialect: For Whom the Bell Tolls in Five Romance Languages (2)
One effective strategy was to use Spanish equivalents for objectionable words, such as "cojones" for "balls" (318) or "Cabrones! Hijos de puta!" (320) for "bastards" and"sons of bitches" Because obscenity is culture-specific, an off color expression...
Shadows of a Literary Dialect: For Whom the Bell Tolls in Five Romance Languages (3)
(14.) Use of thou and ye as nonstandard pronouns was a novelist's stock-in-trade to signal alien speech. About half a century earlier H. Rider Haggard had used them in King Solomon's Mines to alert the reader that a character was speaking an African...
Soldiers' Voices in in Our Time: Hemingway's Ventriloquism
Soldiers in In Our Time encompass three nationalities, several ranks, three battle theaters, and two wars. Critics tend to over-simplify this diversity, hearing only one British voice, and reducing American voices into variants of "the" Nick Adams...
"Where Do We Go from Here?": Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" and American Veterans of World War I (1)
Criticism on Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" has emphasized the story's autobiographical dimension; however, the story also examines the problems encountered by a group to which Hemingway did not actually belong: the combat veterans of the American...
"Where Do We Go from Here?": Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" and American Veterans of World War I (2)
During the summer of 1918, the Division played a key role, at the notorious battle of Belleau Wood, in checking the final German offensive that almost reached Paris. Here many Second-Division units, including both Marine regiments, lost more than fifty...