The Hemingway Review

The Hemingway Review is a semiannual scholarly journal devoted to the life and work of Ernest Hemingway. The Hemingway Review includes feature length articles, book reviews, library information, and current bibliography.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 2, Spring

Acknowledgments
With this issue, The Hemingway Review completes its first quarter-century of life as a scholarly journal. It seems, an especially appropriate time to acknowledge two other milestones--to thank two remarkable people who are leaving us, and to welcome...
Allusions to the Merchant of Venice and the New Testament in "God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen": Hemingway's Anti-Semitism Reconsidered
"God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen" has confused readers and critics alike. The essay points out allusions to The Merchant of Venice and the New Testament, describing how they combine with other subdued references to form an attack on puritanical attitudes...
Current Bibliography
[The current bibliography aspires to include all serious contributions to Hemingway scholarship. Given the substantial quantity of significant critical work appearing on Hemingway's life and writings annually, inconsequential items from the popular...
Dancing with Hemingway
IT WAS SOMEWHAT ANTICLIMACTIC IN THE BEGINNING. I remember the day that a small padded envelope arrived in the mail--no weight of printed pages, no sign of anything "lost" or "masterpiece" or even "Hemingway" about it. Just a CD with "African Book"...
Ethics and "Night Thoughts": "Truer Than the Truth"
HEMINGWAY'S POSTHUMOUS TEXTS constitute a veritable library: A Moveable Feast (1964), Islands in the Stream (1970), "African Journal" (Sports Illustrated, 1971-1972), The Nick Adams Stories (1972), Complete Poems (1979), Selected Letters (1981),...
Expatriate Lifestyle as Tourist Destination: The Sun Also Rises and Experiential Travelogues of the Twenties
In The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway depicts the fictional movements of his characters as experiential travelogue, making the expatriate artist lifestyle a tourist experience. While not explicitly a guidebook, the novel belongs to the tradition of period...
From the 'African Book' to under Kilimanjaro: An Introduction
UNDER KILIMANJARO has an unusual publishing history that relates integrally both to the establishment of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society and the Hemingway Papers housed at the John E Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston. Hemingway's...
Hemingway's Hunting: An Ecological Reconsideration
IN HIS LYRICAL MEDIATION ON TRUE AT FIRST LIGHT, the abridged version of the Africa book published in 1999, Michael Reynolds appropriately "warn[s] the unwary that First Light is not about killing animals, shooting contests, or safari lore" (58)....
"Hemingway's in Our Time: Cubism, Conservation, and the Suspension of Identification
Taking issue with criticism that links In Our Time to Cubist technique and theory, the essay nevertheless finds the comparison of Hemingway's stories and Cubism fruitful for what it tells us about form in his work. The liberated tone of early Cubism...
Hemingway's Lost Friend: Norton S. Baskin
BIOGRAPHICAL ANECDOTES about Ernest Hemingway are myriad. After all, his friends and acquaintances were legion. There is, however, one friend who has gone unnoticed, Norton S. Baskin, the second husband of Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Marjorie...
Safari in the Age of Kenyatta
IN APRIL OF 1953, as the Hemingways were about to leave for Europe en route to Africa for their safari, Jomo Kenyatta, the future president of the Republic of Kenya, was on trial in a British colonial court in Kapenguria, charged with inciting the...
The Editing Process
ONCE INTO THE EDITING, we found it extremely enlightening to observe how the famous Hemingway style evolved as the author composed. In the Paris Review interview with George Plimpton, Hemingway said that he rewrote his previous day's work before...
The Last Good Country
I CONFESS I may be the only Hemingway reviewer in the universe who never read True at First Light. It sat on my shelf unopened for years. To be honest, I was afraid of what I would find in those pages, and more, of what I would not find. What kind...
The Making of under Kilimanjaro
WHEN THE HEMINGWAY SOCIETY'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS each received a copy of the 850-page typescript-manuscript of what Ernest Hemingway had informally referred to as "the African, book" (he never gave it a title), we had responsibilities for its copyrighting...
The "Whine" of Jewish Manhood: Re-Reading Hemingway's Anti-Semitism, Reimagining Robert Cohn
The article examines the significance of Robert Cohn, The Sun Also Rises's infamous Jewish boxer, to the construction of masculinity in Hemingway's novel. Whereas a long critical tradition has treated Cohn's Jewishness largely as evidence of Hemingway's...
Under Kilimanjaro: The Multicultural Hemingway
THE PUBLICATION OF ERNEST HEMINGWAY'S Under Kilimanjaro by Kent State University Press in the fall of 2005 signifies both a terminal point in Hemingway literary history and a departure point for Hemingway scholarship that might open new areas of...
Under Kilimanjaro: The Other Hemingway
ERNEST HEMINGWAY launched his second safari on 1 September 1953. For a portion of the next four months, through January 1954, the then 54 year old writer ran the Kimana Camp in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain of the African...
Under Kilimanjaro-Truthiness at Late Light: Or Would Oprah Kick Hemingway out of Her Book Club
FOR SEVERAL MONTHS NOW, I have been reading and rereading Hemingway's African narrative Under Kilimanjaro (admirably edited by Robert W. Lewis and Robert E. Fleming "to produce a complete reading text" of Hemingway's manuscript), and reassessing...