Journal of European Studies

Journal of European Studies is a magazine specializing in Social Science topics.

Articles from September

Comic Songs in the Occupation
Christopher Lloyd (*) Songs offer us a fascinating insight into the culture and mentality of occupied France. Whereas the two hundred or more feature films produced during the Occupation were constrained by the censors of Vichy or the German Propaganda-Abtellung...
'Hey, You're Dead!': The Multiple Uses of Humour in Representations of British National Defence in the Second World War
Corinna Peniston-Bird (*) Penny Summerfield (+) Humour, especially the sort that is a medium for social and political commentary, plays an important role in the imagined community of a wartime nation. Such humour, like the concept of 'the nation'...
Humour as a Strategy in Propaganda Film: The Case of a French Cartoon from 1944
Humour as a strategy in propaganda film: the case of a French cartoon from 1944 (*) Christian Delporte (+) The collective imagination of war-time France will form the basis of this study, with specific reference to genre which has been greatly...
Humour Is Not a Strategy in War
Christie Davies (*) If we use the word 'strategy' in its most usual war-time sense to refer to a planned and co-ordinated activity directed towards the successful resolution of a conflict, then it is clear that humour is not a strategy in war nor...
Introduction. War in the Twentieth Century: The Functioning of Humour in Cultural Representation
Debra Kelly (*) As the twentieth century came to a close, much scholarly attention was focused on appraisal of its key moments, and especially on notions of memory and commemoration, as witnesses to many of these events passed from being the bearers...
'Irrepressible Chirpy Cockney Chappies'? Humour as an Aid to Survival
Andrew Robertshaw (*) The 'cockney' is a character stereotype that can be traced from Dickens' Artful Dodger in the mid-nineteenth century and Kipling's poetry fifty years later, to the films of the 1940s and 1950s. The quick-witted, resourceful...
'Laugh? I Nearly Died.' A Comparative Study of Humour and Ideology in Gaspard (1915) and le Feu (1916)
Edward A. O'Broen (*) Since war is a common, if highly regrettable occurrence in human history, and laughter fundamental human characteristic, it hardly surprising that soldiers have often found themselves laughing in a war situation. Laughter generated...
Laughter and Tears in the Great War: The Need for Laughter/the Guilt of Humour
Laughter and tears in the great war: the need for laughter/the guilt of humour (*) Jean-Yves Le Naour (+) In France there is a very long tradition of humour linked with political revolt. By the eighteenth century, there were numerous pamphlets,...
Mirroring Societies at War: Pictorial Humour in the British and French Popular Press during the First World War
Pierre Purseigle (*) This chapter will focus on the humour used and displayed by cartoons published in the English and French popular press in 1914-18. This enables us to explore the war culture of the period and particularly its visual component....