Review - Institute of Public Affairs

Review - Institute of Public Affairs is a magazine focusing on Economics

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 3, May

Black and White: Tribal Doubts
DESPITE the new-found respect for cultural diversity in Western countries, some old habits persist. Many people still get carried away by the dazzling aspects of cultural difference. The more exotic the appearance, practices and beliefs of members of...
Caught with Thinking Cap On
Former Labor Minister Gary Johns reviews Mark Latham's Civilising Global Capital: new thinking for Australian Labor and finds it a refreshing cause for optimism. FORMIDABLE' is the adjective that comes to mind when confronted with Latham's tome. It is...
Free_enterprise.com
ALL ABOUT AMERICA Australia and the United States have markedly different roots and attitudes to issues of individual freedom (of which economic freedom is a part). The United States was forged by a war of liberation, and notwithstanding its gradual...
From the Editor
AS the customary duty of an incoming editor, let me thank my predecessors in this post-particularly Tony Rutherford and Ken Baker-or all their work in keeping alive a much needed independent voice in Australian letters and opinion. Clement Attlee once...
Letter from London: Labour's Constitutional Changes
Half good intentions, half-baked plans HE Blair Government came to power last year committed to far-reaching constitutional change to what it called a `centralised, inefficient and bureaucratic' system of government. Its manifesto commitments included:...
Locally Grown, Not Centrally Engineered
Locally Grown, Not Centrally Engineered Kevin Donnelly reviews Social Capital: The Individual, Civil Society and the State by Andrew Norton, Mark Latham, Gary Sturgess, Martin Stewart-Weeks Centre for Independent Studies, 1997,413 tes, $14.95 What do...
Media Propagandists for Social Justice
Journalists act as the eyes and ears of a wider society. But what if their views show systematic differences from that wider society? Will they perform their proper function, or does reportage give way to advocacy? NOWHERE in Australian journalism is...
Misleading Figures: Some Tales from Statistical Wonderland
Official figures are not necessarily truthful ones.Too often, accuracy is sacrificed for effect. A look at misleading statements from those supposed to be servants of the public. IN some halcyon bygone age, both bureaucrats and advisory bodies to government...
One Cheer for a GST
The time has come for the IPA to take a stand on tax reform, including a GST. The IPA supports both tax reform and the introduction of a GST-and the more extensive a GST, the better. True, tax reform is not a first-- order problem. The first-order issue...
Playing the Man: The Modern Inquisition of 'Concerned' Science
Modern advocacy science appears to have enthusiastically adopted the ad hominem principle.And the weaker the science, the stronger the abuse seems to be. A report from the smoking wars. IT is no coincidence that at the very time post-modernist attacks...
Sauce for the Goose
Non-government organizations typically have far less outside oversight than the listed companies they often criticize. A look at why this needs to change and some moves to do so. LARGE companies have, for years, been subject to various codes of conduct,...
Strange Times
A BOYAR LECTURE Eva Cox is at it again with civil society, this time in The Australian on 3 April, which means it wasn't an April fool's joke. Not shy about coming forward, she claims responsibility for the Australian debut of the term `social capital'...
The Case of the Disappearing Property (Rights)
Property being an inviolable and sacred right, no one may be deprived of it except as required by evident and legally ascertained public necessity, and on condition of previous just compensation. The Declaratoin of the Rights of Man by the French National...
The Dreamtime Politics of Uranium
At Hindmarsh Island, false claims about the local Aboriginal culture were advanced in a last-ditch attempt to stop development.At Jabiluka, who really speaks for local Aborigines is again at issue. THERE has never been a good reason why the mining of...
The Labour Legacy of Kaiser Bill
The regulated working week was a `big idea' that Kaiser Wilhelm II liked a lot Unfortunately, so did the Australian union movement. But the benefits of escaping from authoritarian labour controls are now available to those interested. ON 28 March, the...
The Pyrrhonist: Fall-Out from Kyoto
WHAT was really achieved at the latest Conference of Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC)-that is, the international treaty on 'global warming'-held at Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, and what does it mean? At most difficult meetings...
The 'R' Files: Low-Cost Renewable Energy: An Evereceding Prospect
Low-cost Renewable Energy: An Everreceding Prospect GOVERNMENT POLICY ON RENEWABLE ENERGY In his post-Kyoto response to climate change,1 the Prime Minister announced a requirement that 2 per cent of energy from electricity over and above present levels...
The Taxation of Family Trusts
The impression is often given that trusts exist merely to evade taxes.They have far more important reasons to exist than that.And their tax advantages are very limited or even non-existent. THE social welfare lobby and the Commissioner of Taxation are...
What Really Happened in the Northern Territory
In spite of much publicity given to Aboriginal matters, I find there is considerable ignorance abroad concerning the law, administration and culture of the postwar years. This lack of knowledge has, in my view, led to some unfair criticism, even denigration,...