Review - Institute of Public Affairs

Review - Institute of Public Affairs is a magazine focusing on Economics

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 3, December

Another Nobel for Market Economics
Elinor Ostrom, winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, is not your average Nobel winner, writes Julie Novak.The announcement that Elinor Ostrom was the co recipient of this year's Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences attracted considerably greater...
Big Government: A Love Story
Nothing proves love is blind as much as Michael Moore's faith in government, writes Chris Berg.It's probably fair to say Michael Moore pioneered the modern agit-prop feature documentary. Since his (actually rather touching) Roger and Me, which covered...
Climategate: What We've Learned So Far
Chris Berg and Sinclair Davidson look through the leaked Climategate emails and find that global warming science is more uncertain than we've been told.The exposure of thousands of emails and documents from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University...
Could Question Time Be More Than Just a Bunfight?
Question time could be an important part of democracy, writes Christopher Pyne. But it isn't right now.Everyone is a critic these days. Everyone is a journalist, everyone is a commentator. You just need an internet connection. There are pages and pages...
Could the Stimulus Package Have Saved the Country?
Sinclair Davidson on why Kevin Rudd's response to the financial crisis was'too early, too large and just wrong'.Timely, targeted and temporary' is a phrase we have heard a lot over the past eighteen months. 'Go early, go hard, go household' is now being...
Editorial
We have to be careful not to reprise Big Government Conservatism.Tony Abbott's ascension to the Liberal leadership is a victory for conservatism, but will it be a victory for big government conservatism too?The new opposition leader denounced Kevin Rudd's...
Engineering Plenty
Technology, not aid, will feed the starving, writes Louise Staley.As the debate over climate change rages on, the old ideological battleground - biotechnology - is finally starting to clear.At Borlaug Dialogue in October - an annual gathering of development...
Fictional Bias
Even in popular fiction, political bias is a threat to plurality of views, writes Michael MacConnell.There is a very real and very pervasive left-wing bias amongst the majority of authors busily churning out product to stock the shelves of your local...
From the Editor
The solution to climate change - or at least the problems caused by climate change - is economic growth.You don't need an opinion about climate science - nor any opinion about the 'need' for action on carbon dioxide emissions - to observe that political...
Happiness for the Liberal Mind
Happiness research has a justifiably bad reputation, writes Benjamin Hourigan. But there's more to happiness than anti-consumerism.Just two days ago, I was living with my girlfriend. But then we had the worst fight I can remember having with anyone,...
Hey. What Did I Miss?
The Institute of Public Affairs' new Hey.. .What did I miss? is Australia's most widely read weekly email. Featuring the best from the web and the mainstream media in Australia and around the world, Hey... What did I miss? is essential reading.If you're...
How the Left Became the True Conservatives
Richard Allsop on who is really standing athwart history.Given Kevin Rudd's bizarre take on recent Australian history, it is refreshing to read that at least someone in his own party has an intellectually consistent position.Instead of Rudd's tortured...
Liberalism and God
We ignore religion at our peril, writes Greg Melleuish.At an early stage during the French Revolution the decision was taken to reform the French Church.The revolutionaries introduced a number of innovations including the abolition of most religious...
Navigating the Nanny State
Nobody likes the Nanny State, writes David Leyonhjelm. But what about seatbelt laws? How much Nanny is too much Nanny?Most people accept that some things are legitimately the responsibility of the government while others are private matters. Indeed,...
Norman Borlaug 1914-2009
In rural Mexico there is a common saying that four factors caused the green revolution - seeds, water, fertiliser, and Borlaug. The Borlaug in question is Norman Borlaug, a plant geneticist who led the work that resulted in Mexico, India and then Pakistan...
Popular Authoritarianism
Henry Ergar uncovers method in the Rudd government's madness.Robespierre is on the loose in Melbourne's well-heeled suburb of Toorak. Bluerinsed heads tumbling into the basket of the guillotine? The thought causes a certain frisson. Unfortunately, far...
States on a Spending Bender
State governments have no-one to blame but themselves for the condition of their budgets, writes Julie Novak.The noises you may have heard in the background recently were state government political spin machines whirring away at full speed over the condition...
Strange Times
Bulgar brandy'Borisovka' is a new brand of plum brandy in Bulgaria. It is named after the Bulgarian Prime Minister Boiko Borisov who stopped parliament raising taxes on alcohol.The villagers of Kapatovo, in the south Bulgaria, named the 2009 batch of...
The Real Education Revolution
The education revolution of the 1870s is still incomplete, writes Geoffrey Blainey.We are promised an education revolution in Australia. If it arrives, it will be a jubilant day. But will it arrive? The answer is 'no'. We can hope for progress but not...
Universities 'Debate' Climate Change
Universities have bought into the climate change debate in a big big way - degrees in climate change and sustainability seem to be setting up an entire generation to be completely reliant on the climate change consensus'.Take Youthdecide.com.au, which...