Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

Published quarterly by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute reports on anthropology, ethnology and the Royal Anthropological Institute. The editor of this journal is Simon Coleman.

Articles from Vol. 1, No. 1, March

A Second Reflection: Presence and Opposition in Contemporary Maori Art
Contradiction and context In an important essay on Maori art, Michael Jackson interpreted one of the classic forms of carving in terms informed by the Levi-Straussian thesis that tensions and contradictions in social life 'tend towards their resolution'...
Causes and Consequences in Human Evolution
Why are there human beings? The ultimate goal of scientific research is to answer grand questions, to seek more and more powerful theories, and to come to understand life, the universe and everything. However, most actual work is concerned with relatively...
Columbus and Anthropology and the Unknown
The paradox of knowing the unknown (Klein 1965; Macedo 1992) has probably engaged humanity at all times and in all places, if in different ways. It is also at the heart of the anthropological enterprise of figuring out how humanity looks at itself across...
Durga and the King: Ethnohistorical Aspects of Politico-Ritual Life in a South Orissan Jungle Kingdom
Introduction Questions concerning the nature of the relations and interdependencies between the 'political' and the 'religious' domains and concerning the kind of authority held by Hindu kings have for long constituted the principal 'conundrum' (Heesterman...
Forbidden Fruit: Infidelity, Affinity and Brideservice among the Urarina of Peruvian Amazonia
Introduction This article analyses how conjugal arrangements structure the allocation of privileges and duties between the sexes and generations among a 'brideservice society' of Amazonia. It investigates the practical implications of brideservice(1)...
Of Power and Menace: Sepik Art as an Affecting Presence
Introduction The Sepik Basin has often been proclaimed as the most creative and prolific region of so-called traditional, primitive or tribal art production in New Guinea, if not the world (e.g., Anderson 1989: 47; Altman 1967: 9; Buhler et al. 1962:...
Soliciting Gifts and Negotiating Agency: The Spirit of Asking in Botswana
Introduction: 'Give me ten thebe please!' This formula, uttered as an insistent demand by children in urban Botswana, inevitably annoys Westerners to whom it is addressed. And indeed, these forceful requests are inappropriate to local people as well,...
The Court and Kola Nut: Wooing and Witnessing in Northern Ghana
Introduction In all of the centralized and centralizing polities of northern Ghana the kola nut is a ubiquitous companion of chiefship. A Mamprusi chief distributes kola to his people and an offering of kola is placed daily in the shrine which houses...