Canadian Psychology

This journal covers general mental health issues through news, research and practitioners.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 3, August

Boundaryless Psychology: A Discussion*
[HEADNOTE]AbstractThis article is divided into three parts. In the introduction, I echo the case for breaking down boundaries. In the Article Critiques, I point out some of the good points and some concerns about each of the empirical articles in this...
Creativity through Applying Ideas from Fields Other Than One's Own: Transferring Knowledge from Social Psychology to Industrial/organizational Psychology*
AbstractSubfields of psychology can be arguably characterized as islands of unconnected knowledge. The underlying theme of this paper is that these subfields have much to gain by looking at and studying each other's respective literature. This paper...
Eyewitness Identification: Guidelines and Recommendations for Identification Procedures in the United States and in Canada
AbstractInnocent people are convicted each year because of mistaken eyewitness identification. This paper addresses both historical and more contemporary perspectives on the possible limitations of eyewitness identification. The primary purpose of this...
Great Psychologists and Their Times: Scientific Insights into Psychology's History
DKAN KEITH SIMONTON. Great Psychologists and Their Times: Scientific Insights into Psychology's History. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2002, 335 pages. (ISBN 1-55798-896-X, US$49.95 Hardcover).James McKeen Cattell was an inveterate,...
"He Said, She Said": A Psychological Perspective on Historical Memory Evidence in the Courtroom*
AbstractCanadian courts are hearing an increasing number of allegations based on historical incidents. In most cases, complainants or witnesses report remembering the alleged offense continuously since its occurrence. In other cases (e.g., R. v. Francois,...
Memory in Canadian Courts of Law
AbstractThousands of people have found themselves facing criminal or civil litigation as a result of questionable memories. Sometimes these involve faulty memory of eyewitnesses to crimes. Psychological science has informed the legal system about memory...
Psychology without Boundaries: Crossing the Longest Undefended Border in the World*
AbstractThe abolition of boundaries dividing subfields of psychology is made difficult by, among other forces, different reward systems and overwhelming amounts of information. The current collection of papers is an interesting demonstration of the values...
The Use of Knowledge from outside I/O Psychology by I/O Psychologists: A Critique*
AbstractThe aim of the present paper was to comment on three different I/O initiatives involving the transfer of knowledge from outside I/O psychology into the workplace. Overall, it is concluded that the authors have been quite successful at demonstrating...
Toward a Boundaryless Psychology*
[HEADNOTE]AbstractThis series of papers argue for the integrating of psychology as a core discipline. They show the benefit to the science and practice of psychology, of psychologists being aware of and building upon theory and research outside their...
Training the Trainee as Well as the Trainer: Lessons to Be Learned from Clinical Psychology*
AbstractThe training literature in I/O psychology has benefited from empirical research in experimental psychology on such subject matter as massed vs distributive practice, knowledge of results (KOR), and the transfer of learning from the training setting...
Understanding and Treating the Pathological Gambler
ROBERT LADOUCEUR, CAROLINE SYLVAIN, CLAUDE BOUTIN, and CELINE DOUCET. Understanding and Treating the Pathological Gambler. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2002, 192 pages. (ISBN 0-470-84377-2, US$85.00).In recent years, with the increasing availability...
We Said, She Said: A Response to Loftus (2003)
AbstractIn Loftus' (included in this issue) commentary on our article, she agreed with many of our conclusions concerning allegations in "he said, she said" legal cases. However, she focused some criticism on our coverage of recovered memory evidence....

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.