Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 1, Spring

Back to the City: Jewish Sexuate Rights
In a time when the protection of the rights of individuals appears more threatened than ever by religious thinking, it is more important than ever to consider the question of rights in Judaism. This essay describes a Jewish theology of sexuate rights...
"Before the Face of God One Must Not Go with Empty Hands": Transcendence and Levinas' Prophetic Consciousness
While the structure and the bare content of prophetic consciousness may be made accessible by an attitude of pure reflection, in which the concern for their truth and validity is suspended, the sheer force of what is disclosed in such reflection quietly...
Ethics as First Philosophy and the Other's Ambiguity in the Dialogue of Buber and Levinas
On Emmanuel Levinas' instructive readings, Martin Buber's writings sketch the ambiguity of the other whose approach presses for an ethics as first philosophy. They concur that the other, approaching on the horizon of a world I experience, amidst the...
Everyday Speech and Revelatory Speech in Rosenzweig and Wittgenstein
"You can't hear God speaking to someone else, you can hear him only if you are the addressee."-That is a grammatical remark.Wittgenstein1In May 2005 thousands of people, from Egypt to Indonesia, participated in protests against the USA, sparked by a...
Is Deconstruction a Jewish Science? Reflections on "Jewish Philosophy" in Light of Jacques Derrida's Judéïtés
In 1920, Franz Rosenzweig published a pamphlet entitled "Of Bildung There Is No End" ("Bildung und kein Ende"), in which he sought-during the time in which he was involved in founding the Jewish Lehrhaus in Frankfurt-to take stock of the meaning and...
Jewish Philosophy Today
What is Jewish philosophy?1 Why is it philosophy? And if there is such a thing as Jewish philosophy, who counts as a Jewish philosopher? These questions guide any number of essays devoted to the topic of Jewish philosophy; some specifically address the...
Marlène Zarader's the Unthought Debt: The Obfuscation of Heidegger's Jewish Sources
We know Marlène Zarader from her first work, Heidegger et les Paroles de l'origine (Vrin, 1986), in which, as she puts it, her "only ambition was to read Heidegger . . . taking up his work in its entirety from an angle that appeared preeminent.... the...
Persecution and Expiation: A Talmudic Amplification of the Enigma of Responsibility in Levinas
"To tend the cheek to the smiter and be filled with shame."-Lamentations 3:30"It is difficult to forgive Heidegger."-LevinasWho Persecutes Me?Levinas' characterization of the subject in Otherwise than Being as the very articulation of persecution is...
Religious Experience in Levinas and R. Hayyim of Volozhin
One might reflexively think that if there were any claim that could safely be made about Levinas without getting critiqued by other scholars, it would be the claim that Levinas cannot tolerate the idea of religious experience, understood as a direct...
Stretched Flesh-Space: Temple, Talmud, and Merleau-Ponty
When philosophers take an interest in nonphilosophy (religion, art, politics), it is presupposed that philosophy does not stand apart from and to the side of that which is other to it, that philosophical problems are best approached from points both...
The Fall of Eden: Reasons and Reasoning in the Bible and the Talmud
"Knowledge heals the wound that it itself is."G. W. F. HegelFor all the theological angst it has generated, the story in Genesis of Adam and Eve's birth, life, and expulsion from the Garden of Eden (Gen. 1-3) is brief and relatively unsentimental. Like...
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