Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 1, Spring

An Ethics of Inheritance
Inherited wealth is generally quite unequally distributed: it is nearly as unequally distributed as wealth (generally considered) and a great deal more unequally distributed than income. Inheritance is probably the main factor of wealth concentration...
"At What Price Freedom?": The Phenomenological Rudiments of Sartre's Cost-Benefit Analysis
In this essay I want to situate the Sartrean perspective on freedom with respect to a topical, albeit broad, trend in contemporary Western civic discourse. I aim to do so, not only in the hope of showcasing some of the most compelling aspects of Sartre's...
Clashing Styles in Making Art and Decisions: Toward a Philosophy of Complementarity
In David Galenson's recent study of the life cycles of artistic creativity, Old Masters and Young Geniuses, he argues that there are two distinctive and conflicting styles, experimental and conceptual innovation.1He demonstrates the existence of these...
Crisis as a Philosophical Beginning: Hegel and Husserl on the Problem of Motivation
When natural consciousness entrusts itself straightway to Science, it makes an attempt, induced by it knows not what, to walk on its head too, just this once; the compulsion to assume this unwanted posture and to go about in it is a violence it is expected...
Future Impossible: Carl Schmitt, Jacques Derrida, and the Problem of Political Messianism
For more than a decade, the work of Carl Schmitt, the one-time leading jurist for the Third Reich, anti-Semite, and proponent of the authoritarian state and German nationalism, has been undergoing a revival. What is surprising about this flood of new...
Love and Lust after Levinas and Lingis
In A Natural History of Love, Diane Ackerman cites Stendal as asserting there are four kinds of love: mannered love, physical love, vanity love, passionate love.1 An unofficial count in Love in the Time of Cholera revealed the word "love" bestowed with...
The Precarious Lives of Animals: Butler, Coetzee, and Animal Ethics
There never was a human, there never was a life, and no murder has, therefore, ever taken place.Judith Butler, Precarious Life, 147In Precarious Life, Judith Butler explores a Levinasian ethics, or what she calls a Jewish ethics of non-violence.1 Arguing...
The Problem of Defining Pain
What does it mean to be in pain?1 The major trend today is an attempt to offer a physiological explanation of pain. Although instructive medical textbooks generally assess pain as a complex, multidimensional symptom determined not only by physical, but...
Toward a Serresian Reconceptualization of Kantian Respect
For Immanuel Kant the most basic phenomenon of moral life, the categorical imperative, is ineluctably bound up with an essential difference between the sensible and the intelligible, across which practical subjectivity is constituted. More specifically,...
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