Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 44, 2000

Continental Philosophy and Postcolonial Subjects
As a field of specialization in the United States, Continental philosophy generally refers to French and German philosophy in the post-Kantian era. A few great thinkers other than French and German philosophers are included in its canon, for example,...
Deleuze, Hegel, and the Post-Kantian Tradition
Gilles Deleuze has often been characterized as an "anti-dialectical" and hence "anti-Hegelian" thinker. Evidence for these characterizations is not difficult to amass. In his well-known "Letter to Michel Cressole" (reprinted in Negotiations as "Letter...
Editors' Introduction
This 2000 Supplement to Philosophy Today contains Volume 26 of Selected Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. The essays in this volume are selected from the program of the thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and...
Emancipatory Desire and the Messianic Promise
In Specters of Marx, Jacques Derrida writes that deconstruction from the start has questioned an archeo-teleological and onto-theological concept of history as found in Hegel and Marx, in order to think another historicity that does not neutralize or...
Ethics of Care Revisited: Gilligan and Levinas
Discussions of ethics in the Anglo-American philosophical community often begin and end with three traditions: deontological, utilitarian, and neo-Aristotelian. Of course, other orientations are often considered, such as the ethics of care, pragmatism,...
Etienne Balibar's Marxist Spinoza
One can liberate and recompose one's own body, formerly fragmented and dead in the service of an imaginary and, therefore, slavelike subjectivity, and take from this the means to think liberation freely and strongly, therefore, to think properly with...
Gadamer and the Body across Dialogical Contexts
Recently, especially in Gadamerian hermeneutics, dialogue has functioned as a philosopher's stone. The theory of dialogue informs phenomenology-"in the exchange of words, the thing meant becomes more and more present";1 philosophy of mind-"thinking is...
Habits of Hostility on Seeing Race
When the critical legal theorist Gary Peller was growing up during the period of school desegregation in Atlanta, he was chosen among a select group of high school students to participate in a city-wide project of "unlearning racism." The students were...
Lessons from the Philosophy of Race in Mexico
Mexican philosophy has been an especially active site of thinking about race, leaving a considerable conceptual and terminological legacy in, e.g., the concepts of 'La raza cosmica', "indigenismo," and the claim that mestizaje can eliminate racism. Despite...
Negation and Difference
Two theoretical orders have governed thought about negation. In the first, negation is construed as an activity of the mind in its capacity for "pure" thought or language. In the second order, negation is taken as grounded in experience and, so, as prior...
On the Borders of Language and Death: Agamben and the Question of the Animal
On the penultimate page of the Gesamtausgabe edition of Heidegger's essay "Das Wesen der Sprache" ("The Essence of Language"), we find the following brief and enigmatic passage: Die Sterblichen sind jene, die den Tod als Tod erfahren konnen. Das Tier...
Paradox or Contradiction?
David Carr's The Paradox of Subjectivity: The Self in the Transcendental Tradition (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999) argues that recent interpretations of modern philosophy have been disproportionately influenced by Heidegger's reading...
Phantasmphotography
The black orb has me in its sight.1 At the turn of almost every page a solid black point aims at me straight in the eye.The punctum, the absolute singularity of the other, points at me. Perforating the page, each punctum also links together the passages...
Questioning Practice: Heidegger, Historicity, and the Hermeneutics of Faciticity
We remain of necessity strangers to ourselves, we do not understand ourselves, we must mistake ourselves, for us the maxim reads to all eternity: "each is furthest from himself,"--with respect to ourselves we are not "knowers" -Friedrich Nietzsche, On...
Resisting Essence: Kristeva's Process Philosophy
A familiar criticism leveled against Julia Kristeva's philosophy is that it is essentialist..1 Feminist critics such as Nancy Fraser, Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grosz, and Toril Moi take issue with Kristeva's conceptions of the chora, maternity, and the...
Rosa Parks' Performativity, Habitus, and Ability to Play the Game
The work of Pierre Bourdieu has not been widely considered in American "continental" philosophy apart from a recent collection edited by Richard Shusterman and as a subject of criticism in Judith Butler's Excitable Speech. At the very least, his work...
The Impossible Incorporation of Narcissus Mourning and Narcissim in Derrida
What a scene it was! One quite unlike any other, yet like so many before and so many after it. It was the evening of February 26, 1996, at the grand and historic Odeon Theater in Paris. The events of this singular evening were given the title, "Portrait...
The Logic of the Body in Bergson's Motor Schemes and Merleau-Ponty's Body Schema
Contemporary philosophy, above all Merleau-Ponty's, sets us the task of conceiving our being, doing, and thinking as bodily. Kant's critical philosophy specifies the conditions through which alone we cognise a world by reflecting thought onto itself;...
The Site of Affect in Husserl's Phenomenology: Sensations and the Constitution of the Lived Body
SENSATIONS AND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE LIVED BODY To discover affects within Husserl's texts designates a difficult investigation; it points to a theme of which these texts were forced to speak, even as they were explicitly speaking of regional ontologies...
"The Wounder Will Heal": Cognition and Reconciliation in Hegel and Adorno
(ProQuest Information and Learning: Foreign text omitted) The Trojan Epic Cycle comprised many extraordinary stories, most of which were recounted in works other than those attributed to Homer. The following is one of the stranger extracts from the Cycle:...