Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 2, May

After the Scapegoat: René Girard's Apocalyptic Vision and the Legacy of Mimetic Theory
Violence can no longer be checked. From this point of view, we can say that the apocalypse has begun.René GirardIn Battling to the End, René Girard takes a grim view of humanity's capacity to avert a world-ending apocalypse. He asserts that "violence...
Agamben, Kristeva, and the Language of the Sacred
In Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life Giorgio Agamben outlines a theory of biopower that purports to extend and "correct" Michel Foucault's writings in the first volume of The History of Sexuality. Where Foucault suggests that biopower "fosters...
Julia Kristeva's Sacrificial Murders the Body at Work as the Work of Art
"Gloria was lying in a pool of blood with her head cut off."' So begins the second volume - Possessions - of Julia Kristeva's three-volume detective series. Picking up on Kristeva's philosophies of femininity, her parental themes and psychoanalytic orientations,...
Kristeva and Bataille: Archeologies of Prohibition and the Erotics of the Uncanny
If I want to realize totality in my consciousness, I have to relate myself to an immense, ludicrous, and painful convulsion of all of humanity.Georges BatailleIt is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.J. KrishnamurtiThe...
Profaning the Messiah or Why Can't Dulcinea Love Us?
The dance of Isadora Duncan and Sergei Diaghilev, the novel of Proust, the great Jugendstil poetry from Pascoli to Rilke, and, finally and most exemplarily, the silent movie trace the magic circle in which humanity tried for the last time to evoke what...
Reading Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer with René Girard
In his 1 998 book Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Italian original in 1995), Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben draws the attention of his readers to an enigmatic "figure of archaic Roman law," the homo sacer or "sacred man."1 As Agamben...
Sacred Violence and the Death of God: Bataille's Lucid Fanaticism
I would like to emphasize in the first place that human being does not know what religion is.Georges Bataille1In her call for papers addressing the issue of sacred violence, Maria Margaroni indicates the need to think the ethical and political challenges...
Sacrilege
A sanctuary, a sacred precinct, is a dark or radiant place marked out by prohibitions and taboos, separated from the profane sphere. To encounter there the sacred is to encounter the power of what is separated from, what marks the limit of the world...
The Ambivalence of the Sacred in Julia Kristeva
Je vais te dire pourquoi le sacré,pour moi, c'est aussi cela,et peut-être seulement cela:l'imaginaire.Le féminin et le sacréJulia Kristeva's early work La Revolution du Langage Poétique, frequently mistaken for her doctoral thesis,1 addresses from the...
The Sacred of Violence, Intimacy, and Love
Philippe Nemo: How does one begin thinking? Through the questions one poses to and of oneself, following original occurrences? Or through the thoughts and works with which one first enters into contact? Emmanuel Lévinas: It probably begins through traumatisms...
The Task of Journalism in the Age of Terrorism Imagining the Profane
Over the course of its history, American journalism has bound itself, consciously and unconsciously, to the complex narrative of American exceptionalism by means of an embedded structural commitment to a dialectical unfolding America's presumed unique...
Violence and the Sacred: Archaic Connections, Contemporary Aporias, Profane Thresholds
(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)When Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" was first published in the June 28, 1948issue of the New Yorker, the readers' response was totally unanticipated. As Peter Kosenko puts it, "hundreds of letters poured...