Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 2, Spring

A Dialectic of Dissatisfaction: Interviewing Simon Critchley on Education and Philosophy
Simon Critchley, the Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research, is a philosopher whose work has had few limits, either in form or subject matter. He has engaged the intersections of literature, ethics, politics, phenomenology,...
Care of Death: On the Teaching of Reiner Schürmann
In the Phaedo, Socrates makes Simmias laugh when he suggests that "those who happen to have gotten in touch with philosophy in the right way devote (epitedeua) themselves to nothing else but dying and being dead."1 Simmias himself admits that he is not...
Complex Identities and Relational Freedoms
Complex Identities and Relational FreedomsI am pleased to comment on Professor Allison Weir's recent book, Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory Between Power and Connection, as I have long read and admired her work. Moreover, I am deeply sympathetic...
Cosmic Cinema: On the Philosophical Films of Terrence Malick
Since winning the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2011 for his fifth feature film, The Tree of Life, the American director Terrence Malick has embarked upon the most prolific period of his filmmaking career. It has been quite a turnaround. In just five years...
Danto as Educator
From the title "Schopenhauer as Educator" (1874)1 it would be natural to expect Nietzsche to offer us a detailed account of how Schopenhauer's philosophical system influenced his own thought, or perhaps at a minimum how the sage of Frankfurt's work was...
Hamlet’s Potentiality: Reply to Jennifer Bates and Andrew Benjamin
Let me begin by thanking Jennifer Bates and Andrew Benjamin for the time they've put into this session and for their generous, stimulating comments about my book.1 They have both written brilliantly about Shakespeare-Bates most prominently in Hegel and...
Identities and Freedom: Power, Love, and Other Dangers
I want to begin by thanking Margaret McLaren and Johanna Meehan for their very thoughtful and generous responses to my book, Identities and Freedom. These papers were originally presented at our book panel at the SPEP conference in October 2015, where...
Introduction to the Special Issue: On Philosophical Education
A very healthy thing for philosophy would be to rethink its own historical origins. I think it has been much too unhistorical and has lost a lot of the insights of the past. Fruitful lines of thinking and development have been abandoned partly because...
Learning How to See: An Interview with Judith Butler
Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. in philosophy from Yale University in 1984. She is the author of...
Philosophy and Its Relation to Other Disciplines in Derrida’s Writings on Education
Derrida's writings on education, most of which are gathered in Du droit a la philosophie, form a rich and multifaceted body of work.1 In these writings Derrida covers a wide range of topics related to the teaching of philosophy, including the appropriate...
Richard Rorty: The Philosopher as Man of Letters
I arrived at Princeton as a new graduate student in September 1979. It was a big step for me. I had never been east of the Mississippi, nor had I any experience with elite institutions like Princeton University. During the first semester, I wrote my...
Teaching and Learning at the Autonomous University during Barcelona’s Seventies: The Remains of Philosophy
The opening pages in the traditional edition of Aristotle's Metaphysics are focused on the test that may be used to distinguish ordinary knowledge (aisthesis or sensation and empeiria or experience) from science. The elementary form of science is what...
The Ends of Negation: Cutrofello’s Hamlet
What if it were not just Hamlet? And yet still Hamlet, even though whatever it was that Hamlet named could no longer be held by that name. In Hamlet therefore content would have spilled over, spilling from Hamlet. Hamlet, now as name and play (Hamlet),...
The Rub of the Negative: Concrete Universality, the Sache Selbst, and Noumena in Cutrofello’s All for Nothing
I would like to thank the organizers of this panel for inviting me-I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and I compliment Andrew Cutrofello on his tremendous accomplishment. This is a work of great complexity and breadth, covering philosophical and...
Today’s Psychotic Academy: Risking the Pedagogy of “ŽIžek’s 180”
At a 2011 Google Zeitgeist conference, Stephen Hawking boldly said, "philosophy is dead."1 And it is dead essentially because it's passé. Hawking's thinks that philosophy is like a guy who shows up at a cocktail party at dawn after the guests have left....
Towards (Back to?) a Philosophical Education: An Interview with Gianni Vattimo
Born in 1936 in Turin (Italy), Gianni Vattimo hardly needs any introduction, as his pensiero debole (weak thought) has for decades been recognized as a major contribution to contemporary philosophy. Vattimo graduated from the University of Turin under...
“What’s Love Got to Do with It?”: Allison Weir’s Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory between Power and Connection
At some point in our lives we have all felt like insects, pinned, labeled and displayed by someone and defined in ways that we don't embrace, and for purposes that are not our own. But, Allison Weir asks in her recent book, Identities and Freedom: Feminist...
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