Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 1, Winter

Absolute and Relative Perfection of the "Monsters": Politics and History in Giacomo Leopardi
1. Giacomo Leopardi as a 'Philosopher'The philosophical personality of Giacomo Leopardi is still little known in the Anglophone world. He was presented primarily as a poet to the general public for a long time, but his career as a classical philologist...
A Pragmatics of Political Judgement: Hobbes and Spinoza
I. Introduction: A Pragmatics of JudgementTo take part in politics is to judge and in judgement we seek rectitude and finality. We attempt to establish what is the case in matters of right and wrong, advantageous and harmful, just and unjust. We declare...
Diderot's Monsters, between Physiology and Politics
As a point of departure, I think of that scene from D'Alembert's Dream when Mademoiselle de Lespinasse is mixing up the threads on her skein winder. By removing threads from the bundle or by adding others, she can form now a noseless animal, now an earless...
From the Soul: Theriopolitics in the Republic
mian men idean theriou poikilou kai polykephalou1At the heart of the Platonic Republic, amidst the most examined of philosophic spaces, a purloined letter gazes back unconcealed into the inspecting stare; most efficaciously, under the eyes of centuries...
Governed as It Were by Chance: Monstrous Infinitude and the Problem of Nature in the Work of Spinoza
To the degree that the world is now made up of divergent series . . . crapshooting replaces the game of Plenitude.-Gilles Deleuze1IntroductionWhen Spinoza wrote The Ethics in the 1600s the world was largely a wild place. Intense human settlement occupied...
Intentionality and Normativity: A Comment on Steve Crowell's Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger 1
The main theme of Steve Crowell's excellent Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger is "the connection between normativity and meaning" (1), a central issue in both Husserl's and Heidegger's phenomenological philosophy, but not addressed...
Lucretius and Monsters: Between Bergson and Canguilhem
1. Between Bergson and CanguilhemThe issue of monsters, far from being a simple or marginal curiosity within Lucretius' theoretical system, is one of its pivotal concepts; different interpretations of it are likely to lead towards very different understandings...
Monsters of Biopower: Terror(ism) and Horror in the Era of Affect
The modern Greek word for "monster" is "t??a?," a word which, according to J. B. Hofmann's Etymological Dictionary of Ancient Greek, in ancient Greek meant a "rare sign, an unusual natural phenomenon," including a "wonder" and "everything that functioned...
Phenomenology, Meaning, and Measure: Response to Maxime Doyon and Thomas Sheehan
§1. Thinking PhenomenologicallyIt is a privilege to have been read so generously by two such capable and distinguished philosophers.1 I owe Thomas Sheehan and Maxime Doyon a great debt, not only for doing me the honor of participating in this exchange,...
Phenomenology Rediviva
Steven Crowell's Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger (Cambridge, 2013) is something of a manifesto-a wake-up call, a bracing tonic, a much-needed therapy for phenomenology in general and for Heidegger studies in particular, especially...
The Beast and the Sovereign According to Hobbes
Hobbes immediately established the link between monstrosity and sovereignty in the title of one of the most famous work of the history of political thought, Leviathan (1651). This title obviously referred to the biblical monster, especially as it is...
The Monstrosity of Matter in Motion: Galileo, Descartes, and Hobbes's Political Epistemology
The change-over from a developmental to a static conception of matter was as profound as the change from a geocentric to a heliocentric astronomy, and its effects were as far reaching.-Stephen Toulmin, The Architecture of MatterIntroductionThe seventeenth...
The Power of the Monstrous: An Introduction to the Special Issue
Alterity and Otherness have often been the privileged field of contemplation within Western philosophy. Since the Presocratic philosophers, Being has been defined in relation to-and more often opposed to-non-Being, just as Goodness has been considered...
Ubu-Esque Sovereign, Monstrous Individual: Death in Biopolitics
Death was now something permanent, something that slips into life, perpetually gnaws at it, diminishes it and weakens it.-Michel Foucault, Society Must be DefendedMichel Foucault famously claims that, starting from the seventeenth century, power ceases...
Werewolves in the Immunitary Paradigm
I. IntroductionThe biopolitical perspective initiated by Michel Foucault highlights the limitations of traditional categories of political philosophy to explicate power relations. As Foucault notes, power "produces things, it induces pleasure, forms...
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