Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 4, Fall

A New Querelle of Universals
In this very moment, a new "Querelle of Universals" is keeping philosophers busy, hence philosophy itself, in a broad sense, which of course also overlaps with many other disciplines in the Humanities. To some extent, it is continuing the "Querelle de...
Antinomies of the Super-Ego: ÉTienne Balibar and the Question of the Psycho-Political
Re-inventing the Super-EgoHow, drawing upon psychoanalysis, might one think of the relationship between psychological states or conditions, on the one hand, and political forms and practices, on the other? What resources does psychoanalysis offer for...
Capitalism and the Conflict over Universality: A Feminist Perspective
Three Viewpoints on UniversalityIn a moving piece, "The Mastery of Non-Mastery" Mick Taussig recounts his travel to a Kobane devastated by the ISIS siege. Reporting a conversation with women combatants in the Women's House, he quotes the following words:...
Dialectics of Progress
Amy Allen's The End of Progress is an important contribution to debates about critique and normativity within Frankfurt School critical theory. Although the book confronts the Frankfurt School with the post- and decolonial challenge, it is foremost an...
Editors' Introduction: ÉTienne Balibar and Remembering Werner Hamacher
The fall issue of Philosophy Today is devoted to the work of Étienne Balibar and in memory of Werner Hamacher. This special issue on Balibar's work has been long in the planning, emerging out of a 2015 conference at DePaul University on Balibar's work,...
Eulogy for Werner Hamacher
Werner,Werner, you here with us, you so near and so far, as far as near, Werner, farther . . .Werner, I am speechless-and you tell me right away: "Whoever is speechless has something of language in the lessness"Something or perhaps everything, you will...
I May Not Be Cool, but I Am Classy: A Response to Way Too Cool
Event, Context[O]ne might say a symptom is a surface manifestation of a deeper dysfunction. Difficulties, aporias, contradictions, surface contradictions we encounter in the text show us that something is wrong, indicate a need for investigation, and...
Inexhaustibility at the Outset: Notes on Hamacher and Philology
(ProQuest: ... denotes non-US-ASCII text omitted.)Eine klassische Schrift muß nie ganz verstanden werden können. Aber die, welche gebildet sind und sich bilden, müssen immer mehr draus lernen wollen.-Friedrich Schlegel, Kritische FragmenteMight there...
"Living in the Interregnum": Hegelian Reflections on the "Dynamic Universal"
What I set out to present here are some reflections growing out of my work on the method of Hegel's Logic. I take the "method" thematized at the end of the Logic as the inner modality according to which any dynamic process unfolds-processes in the world...
Now, Hamacher
I.It must have been late June 2017 when I visited the Giacometti retrospective at the Tate. About two rooms from the end, the curators had assembled a number of the portraits for which the artist is perhaps best known: the tall, skinny walking figures,...
Other Pains
1. DIAPLEKEIN (PiNDAR, 490 BC)Threnos, so the wail and the dirge are called in Greek. How from whimpering and moaning, from hissing, whining, and groaning, an ordered sound, an artistic form, an articulated and reproducible presentation emerge-this is...
Rationality, Normativity, and Critique: Response to Sheth and Zambrana
First of all, I'd like to thank the SPEP Executive Committee, and especially Alia Al-Saji, for organizing the Author Meets Critics session on which this book symposium is based. I'd also like to thank Rocío Zambrana and Falguni Sheth for their insightful,...
Reading Violence, Lamenting Language: On Benjamin and Hamacher
Without distance it is hard to see something in reading. Whether distance is also the objective of reading-or whether that is, rather, involvement-is not least a question of violence. This violence is at stake here.In his 1986 essay "The Word Wolke-If...
Saint ÉTienne: Balibar, Grexit, and Universalism
If Europe is for us first of all the name of an unresolved political problem, Greece is one of its centers, not because of the mythical origins of our civilization, symbolized by the Acropolis of Athens, but because of the current problems concentrated...
Selling T-Shirts at SPEP: The Unexamined Ego of Continental Philosophy; Response to Wendling and Lee
When I was about a junior in college, a good friend and I came up with a brilliant plan to manage socializing. In what was clearly a burgeoning elitist paradigm of intellectualism, we decided that parties should require a simple kind of "identification...
Spinoza's Commonwealth and the Anthropomorphic Illusion
Just as in the state of nature the man who is guided by reason is the most powerful and the most his own master, so a Commonwealth will be most powerful and most its own master ifit is guided by reason. For the Right of a Commonwealth is determined by...
The Discourse of Progress
As a former colleague of Amy Allen on the Executive Committee of SPEP, I am honored to have been invited to discuss her new book, The End of Progress, here at SPEP. Hers is a courageous intellectual project, and it bears a clear mark of her everyday...
The One Right No One Ever Has
1.One of the decisive statements in the history of law and legal theory claims that right and rights are without substantial ground. As suggested by the subheading under which it appears in the chapter on "The Decline of the Nation-State and the End...
Turn Up the Heat: A Look at Shannon Winnubst's Way Too Cool
Neoliberalism: Good for Gay People, Bad for Black PeopleThe thought oversimplifies, hanging on the equivocations of its central concepts: gay and black, let alone, good and bad; difficulties so fraught that I have scarcely allowed myself to think this...
(Under-)Standing for Oneself
Werner Hamacher used to say that mortality is the greatest scandal of humanity. And in fact, his mortality seems outright scandalous to me. He had such an intense presence that it is hard to understand his absence. But what does it mean to understand...
Werner Hamacher: Wandering about Language
Saying goodbye to a friend is always hard. Perhaps the difficulty lies in our insistence that we not let go of him, or our fear that we will no longer see ourselves in his eyes. Perhaps it is the ultimately futile attempt to capture a man, especially...
What Comes before the Citizen? Violence and the Limits of the Political in Balibar
We can situate Étienne Balibar's political philosophy within a trajectory that views democracy as central to the human and the polity, while at the same time refusing to reduce democracy to any form of constituted power-be that the constitutional form...
Whither Balibar's Europeanism?
Etienne Balibar has for more than a quarter of a century now consistently orientated himself towards the project of European political integration. In this paper, I will mount a critique of Balibar's "Europeanism" (a term to which Balibar has lately,...
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