Vanderbilt Law Review

Vanderbilt Law Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 62, No. 6, November

Auditing the PCAOB: A Test to the Accountability of the Uniquely Structured Regulator of Accountants
I. INTRODUCTIONAfter a slew of highly publicized corporate accounting scandals during the early 2000s at prominent companies - including Enron, WorldCom, Adelphia, and Tyco - public confidence in the integrity of financial reporting by public companies...
A Uniform System for the Enforceability of Forum Selection Clauses in Federal Courts
I. INTRODUCTION: THE TALE OF STEWART, RICOH, AND CAROLIn the early 1980s, a successful and ambitious Alabama businessman named Walter H. Stewart purchased a failing local copying business. Through the Stewart Organization, a corporation he controlled,...
Does Copyright Law Promote Creativity? an Empirical Analysis of Copyright's Bounty
Modern copyright law is based upon a theory: increase copyright protection and you increase the number of creative works available to society. This theory has been the driving force behind an economic vision that has expanded, beyond all recognition,...
Fearing Fear Itself: Photo Identification Laws, Fear of Fraud, and the Fundamental Right to Vote
I. INTRODUCTIONIn his first inaugural address, President Franklin Roosevelt assured the American people that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself."1 President Roosevelt's famous statement begs the question, however, of why we should fear fear...
Jumping the Pond: Transnational Law and the Future of Chemical Regulation
Just as domestic pollution can cause transnational externalities, domestic environmental regulation can create transnational ripple effects in other jurisdictions. In this Article, I show how chemical regulation - long a weak link in the network of U.S....
The End of Objector Blackmail?
Courts and commentators have long been concerned with holdout problems in the law. This Article focuses on a holdout problem in class action litigation known as objector "blackmail." Objector blackmail occurs when individual class members delay the final...
The Liberal Tradition of the Supreme Court Clerkship: Its Rise, Fall, and Reincarnation?
This Article presents the first comprehensive empirical study of the post-clerkship employment of law clerks at the Supreme Court from 1882 to the present, and it uses that data to flesh out a historical and institutional interpretation of the clerkship...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.