Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law is a trade journal focusing on Financial Law

Articles from Vol. 9, No. 1, 2003

Bag Wars and Bank Wars, the Gucci and Banque National De Paris Hostile Bids: European Corporate Culture Responds to Active Shareholders
The internationalization of capital markets and the decreasing importance of national political boundaries have brought individual domestic economies closer together. With this development, investors from foreign countries increasingly exert their influence...
Disclosure of the Irrelevant? - Impact of the Sec's Final Proxy Voting Disclosure Rules
INTRODUCTIONOn several recent occasions, Harvey Pitt, then acting Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), discussed the importance of proxy voting disclosure by investment advisers and mutual funds to ensure that such fiduciary obligations...
From Behind the Corporate Veil: The Outing of Wall Street's Investment Banking Scandals - Why Recent Regulations May Not Mean the Dawn of a New Day
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of...
If Multidisciplinary Partnerships Are Introduced into the United States, What Could or Should Be the Role of General Counsel?
INTRODUCTIONThis Article is not about whether or not Multidisciplinary Partnerships (MDPs)1 should be introduced into the United States marketplace, nor is it concerned with predicting if MDPs will actually be introduced into the United States. Instead,...
"In Employers We Trust": The Federal Right of Contribution under Internal Revenue Code Section 6672
The secret wealth of commerce, and the precarious profits of art or labour, are susceptible only of a discretionary valuation, which is seldom disadvantageous to the interest of the treasury; and as the person of the trader supplies the want of a visible...
Multinational Enforcement of U.S. Securities Laws: The Need for the Clear and Restrained Scope of Extraterritorial Subject-Matter Jurisdiction
Despite the usual presumption for the territorial application of securities laws, U.S. courts have applied domestic antifraud provisions extraterritorially to transactions in other countries, justifying its actions as necessary to protect U.S. investors...

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