Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

Provides broad range of topics in all areas of experimental psychology. The journal publishes theory and review articles, reports on experimental work, and coverage of methods in all areas.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 6, December

Attentional Capture under High Perceptual Load
Attentional capture by abrupt onsets can be modulated by several factors, including the complexity, or perceptual load, of a scene. We have recently demonstrated that observers are less likely to be captured by abruptly appearing, task-irrelevant stimuli...
Atypical Categorization in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
Children with autism spectrum disorder process many perceptual and social events differently from typically developing children, suggesting that they may also form and recognize categories differently. We used a dot pattern categorization task and prototype...
Can Associative Information Be Strategically Separated from Item Information in Word-Pair Recognition?
Subjects learned word pairs either once or three times but were instructed to ignore the association of the two words in each pair and only to memorize the individual words at study and recognize them at test. The test word pairs included intact pairs,...
Converging Measures of Workload Capacity
Does processing more than one stimulus concurrently impede or facilitate performance relative to processing just one stimulus? This fundamental question about workload capacity was surprisingly difficult to address empirically until Townsend and Nozawa...
Directed Forgetting in Young Children: Evidence for a Production Deficiency
When people are cued to forget a previously studied list of items and to learn a new list instead, such cuing typically leads to forgetting of the first list and to memory enhancement of the second. In two experiments, we examined such listwise directed...
Dissociating between Cardinal and Ordinal and between the Value and Size Magnitudes of Coins
In mathematics, the ordinal (relative) magnitude of a numerical object conveys a separate meaning from its cardinal (absolute) magnitude, whereas its physical size bears no inherent relationship to its magnitude. In numerical cognition, the ordinal-cardinal...
Eye Movements, the Perceptual Span, and Reading Speed
The perceptual span or region of effective vision during eye fixations in reading was examined as a function of reading speed (fast readers were compared with slow readers), font characteristics (fixed width vs. proportional width), and intraword spacing...
Feeling Socially Powerless Makes You More Prone to Bumping into Things on the Right and Induces Leftward Line Bisection Error
Social power affects the manner in which people view themselves and act toward others, a finding that has attracted broad interest from the social and political sciences. However, there has been little interest from those within cognitive neuroscience....
How Inherently Noisy Is Human Sensory Processing?
Like any physical information processing device, the human brain is inherently noisy: If a participant is presented with the same sensory stimulus multiple times and is asked to press one of two buttons in response to some property of the stimulus, the...
Monetary Reward Increases Attentional Effort in the Flanker Task
An important question is whether monetary reward can increase attentional effort in order to improve performance. Up to now, evidence for a positive answer is weak. Therefore, in the present study, the flanker task was used to examine this question further....
Morphemic Ambiguity Resolution in Chinese: Activation of the Subordinate Meaning with a Prior Dominant-Biased Context
In the present study, we examined how morphemic ambiguity is resolved using the visual-world paradigm. Participants were presented with Chinese bimorphemic words containing an ambiguous morpheme (analogous to the suffix -ER in TEACHER and TALLER) and...
Nested Prospectivity in Perception: Perceived Maximum Reaching Height Reflects Anticipated Changes in Reaching Ability
Perception of possibilities for behavior is a necessarily prospective (i.e., forward-looking) act. Such prospectivity is highlighted by the fact that, in general, behaviors are nested within behaviors over a number of spatial and temporal scales. Participants...
Performing the Unexplainable: Implicit Task Performance Reveals Individually Reliable Sequence Learning without Explicit Knowledge
Memory-impaired patients express intact implicit perceptual-motor sequence learning, but it has been difficult to obtain a similarly clear dissociation in healthy participants. When explicit memory is intact, participants acquire some explicit knowledge...
Processing Unrelated Language Can Change What You See
When we hear a story, do we naturally imagine the visual scene being described? Do the representations derived in the course of normal language comprehension interact with visual perception broadly? For example, might understanding language change how...
Reconsidering "Evidence" for Fast-and-Frugal Heuristics
In several recent reviews, authors have argued for the pervasive use of fast-and-frugal heuristics in human judgment. They have provided an overview of heuristics and have reiterated findings corroborating that such heuristics can be very valid strategies...
Single-Letter Coloring and Spatial Cuing Do Not Eliminate or Reduce a Semantic Contribution to the Stroop Effect
The automaticity of semantic activation in the Stroop task is still the subject of considerable debate (Augustinova & Ferrand, 2007; Manwell, Roberts, & Besner, 2004). The present experiments were designed to assess whether coloring and cuing...
Spatial Short-Term Memory Assists in Maintaining Occluded Objects
We examined the role of spatial short-term memory (SSTM) in maintaining the hidden portions of occluded objects. We measured the degree of maintenance by asking participants to perform an object-based attention task on occluded objects while maintaining...
Speeded Induction under Uncertainty: The Influence of Multiple Categories and Feature Conjunctions
When people are uncertain about the category membership of an item (e.g., Is it a dog or a dingo?), research shows that they tend to rely only on the dominant or most likely category when making inductions (e.g., How likely is it to befriend me?). An...
Subitizing in Congenitally Blind Adults
We investigated the role of vision in tactile enumeration within and outside the subitizing range. Congenitally blind and sighted (blindfolded) participants were asked to enumerate quickly and accurately the number of fingers stimulated. Both groups...
Temporal Control of Internal States in Pigeons
To understand how animals serially organize complex competing behaviors, we tested pigeons in a sequential task-switching procedure. Daily sessions involved two conditional discrimination tasks that were presented in sequence. In Experiment 1, the first...
Temporal Dynamics of Generalization and Representational Distortion
Individuals generalize differently depending on the extent of their past experiences and what they learn from them. For instance, the peak of generalization can shift from a familiar stimulus to novel ones when the familiar stimulus has been repeatedly...
Testing a Postselectional Account of Across-Dimension Switch Costs
In visual search for a pop-out target, responses are faster when the target dimension from the previous trial is repeated than when it changes. Currently, it is unclear whether these across-dimension switch costs originate from processes that guide attention...
The Costs and Benefits of Providing Feedback during Learning
It seems uncontroversial that providing feedback after a test, in the form of the correct answer, enhances learning. In real-world educational situations, however, the time available for learning is often constrained- and feedback takes time. We report...
The Nature and Position of Processing Determines Why Forgetting Occurs in Working Memory Tasks
The effect of potentially distracting processing within working memory was examined by varying the nature and position of processing across conditions of a Brown-Peterson-like task. Separate groups of participants carried out verbal or visuospatial processing...
Unilateral Muscle Contractions Enhance Creative Thinking
Following the notion of relative importance of the right hemisphere (RH) in creative thinking, we explored the possibility of enhancing creative problem solving by artificially activating the RH ahead of time using unilateral hand contractions. Participants...
Walking through Doorways Causes Forgetting: Environmental Integration
Memory for objects declines when people move from one location to another (the location updating effect). However, it is unclear whether this is attributable to event model updating or to task demands. The focus here was on the degree of integration...

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