Memory & Cognition

A journal that covers human memory and learning, conceptual processes, and problem solving in a scholarly forum.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 5, July

Can the Survival Recall Advantage Be Explained by Basic Memory Processes?
Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007) demonstrated a striking phenomenon: Words rated for relevance to a grasslands survival scenario were remembered better than identical words encoded under other deep processing conditions. Having replicated this...
Discriminating between Changes in Bias and Changes in Accuracy for Recognition Memory of Emotional Stimuli
A debate has emerged as to whether recognition of emotional stimuli is more accurate or more biased than recognition of nonemotional stimuli. Teasing apart changes in accuracy versus changes in bias requires a measurement model. However, different models...
Effects of Adult Aging on Utilization of Temporal and Semantic Associations during Free and Serial Recall
Older adults show poorer performance than young adults at word list recall, especially for order information. In contrast with this temporal association deficit, older adults are generally adept at using preexisting semantic associations, when present,...
Elaborative Processing and Conjunction Errors in Recognition Memory
Four experiments were conducted in order to examine the influence of elaborative processing at encoding on recognition memory conjunction lure errors. In these experiments, participants generated cues for compound words as wholes (e.g., haywire) or as...
Eye Movements and Parafoveal Word Processing in Reading Chinese
In two experiments, a parafoveal lexicality effect in the reading of Chinese (a script that does not physically mark word boundaries) was examined. Both experiments used the boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) and indicated that the lexical properties of...
How Task Errors Affect Subsequent Behavior: Evidence from Distributional Analyses of Task-Switching Effects
Switch costs in task switching are often assumed to reflect the strengthening of task-related associations. Recently, we provided evidence that committing an error leads to the strengthening of the wrong task (Steinhauser & Hübner, 2006). In the...
Influence of Display Type and Cue Format on Task-Cuing Effects: Dissociating Switch Cost and Right-Left Prevalence Effects
In previous studies of task switching and of the right-left prevalence effect, researchers have used a procedure in which the stimulus on each trial occurs in one of four quadrants, and responses are made by pressing one of two diagonally arranged response...
Inspecting Visual Mental Images: Can People "See" Implicit Properties as Easily in Imagery and Perception?
Can people "see" previously unnoticed properties in objects that they visualize, or are they locked into the organization of the pattern that was encoded during perception? To answer this question, we first asked a group to describe letters of the alphabet...
Involuntary Autobiographical Memories in and outside the Laboratory: How Different Are They from Voluntary Autobiographical Memories?
In two studies, we compared the characteristics and retrieval times of involuntary and voluntary autobiographical memory under controlled laboratory conditions. A new laboratory task of involuntary autobiographical memories involved detecting vertical...
Temporal Isolation Does Not Facilitate Forward Serial Recall-Or Does It?
In numerous recent studies in short-term memory, it has been established that forward serial recall is unaffected by the temporal isolation of to-be-remembered items. These findings contradict the temporal distinctiveness view of memory, which expects...
The Effect of Stimulus Availability on Task Choice in Voluntary Task Switching
The voluntary task switching paradigm allows subjects to choose which task to perform on each trial in a stimulus environment affording multiple tasks. The present study examined the effect of stimulus availability on task choice. Subjects viewed displays...
The Effects of Payout and Probability Magnitude on the Allais Paradox
The Allais paradox decision bias was first offered as a challenge to the expected utility theory over 60 years ago. Although the Allais paradox is a standard challenge for normative theories of risky choice, its causes are not well understood. The present...
Working Memory Involvement in Dual-Task Performance: Evidence from the Backward Compatibility Effect
In three experiments, the authors supported the hypothesis that parallel response activation seen in dual-task performance results from holding Task 2 rules in working memory (WM) while performing Task 1. To this end, the authors used the backward compatibility...
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