Memory & Cognition

A journal that covers human memory and learning, conceptual processes, and problem solving in a scholarly forum.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 2, March

A Model of Rotated Mirror/normal Letter Discriminations
Rotated mirror/normal letter discriminations are thought to require mental rotation in order to determine the direction of facing of the stimulus. The response time (RT) function over orientation tends to be curved, rather than the linear function found...
Contributions of Category and Fine-Grained Information to Location Memory: When Categories Don't Weigh In
Several studies have shown that people's memory for location can be influenced by categorical information. According to a model proposed by Huttenlocher, Hedges, and Duncan (1991), people estimate location by combining fine-grained item-level information...
Distinguishing between Attributional and Mnemonic Sources of Familiarity: The Case of Positive Emotion Bias
Does familiarity arise from direct access to memory representations (a mnemonic account) or from inferences and diagnostic cues (an attributional account)? These theoretically distinct explanations can be difficult to distinguish in practice, as is shown...
Emotional Context at Learning Systematically Biases Memory for Facial Information
Emotion influences memory in many ways. For example, when a mood-dependent processing shift is operative, happy moods promote global processing and sad moods direct attention to local features of complex visual stimuli. We hypothesized that an emotional...
Enactment and Retrieval
The enactment effect is one of a number of effects (e.g., bizarreness, generation, perceptual interference) that have been treated in common theoretical frameworks, most of them focusing on encoding processes. Recent results from McDaniel, Dornburg,...
Implementation Intention Encoding Does Not Automatize Prospective Memory Responding
An implementation intention encoding, one that specifies the concrete situation that is appropriate for initiating an intended action and links that situational cue to the intended action, has been shown to improve prospective memory. One proposed mechanism...
In Conflict with Ourselves? an Investigation of Heuristic and Analytic Processes in Decision Making
Many theorists propose two types of processing: heuristic and analytic. In conflict tasks, in which these processing types lead to opposing responses, giving the analytic response may require both detection and resolution of the conflict. The ratio bias...
Musicians' and Nonmusicians' Short-Term Memory for Verbal and Musical Sequences: Comparing Phonological Similarity and Pitch Proximity
Language-music comparative studies have highlighted the potential for shared resources or neural overlap in auditory short-term memory. However, there is a lack of behavioral methodologies for comparing verbal and musical serial recall. We developed...
Optimizing Retrieval as a Learning Event: When and Why Expanding Retrieval Practice Enhances Long-Term Retention
Retrieving information from memory makes that information more recallable in the future than it otherwise would have been. Optimizing retrieval practice has been assumed, on the basis of evidence and arguments tracing back to Landauer and Bjork (1978),...
Recognition and Context Memory for Faces from Own and Other Ethnic Groups: A Remember-Know Investigation
People are more accurate at recognizing faces from their own ethnic group than at recognizing faces from other ethnic groups. This other-ethnicity effect (OEE) in recognition may be produced by a deficit in recollective memory for other-ethnicity faces....
Strategic Behavior without Awareness? Effects of Implicit Learning in the Eriksen Flanker Paradigm
This experiment investigated whether subjects' selection and use of strategies in detecting a target letter in a flanker task requires intention. Subjects' expectancies for compatible and incompatible trials (trials on which the response to the flanker...
The Role of Phonological and Visual Working Memory in Complex Arithmetic for Chinese- and Canadian-Educated Adults
Two experiments were conducted to test cultural differences in the role of phonological and visual working memory in complex arithmetic. Canadian- and Chinese-educated students solved complex subtraction problems (e.g., 85 - 27; Experiment 1) and complex...
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