Memory & Cognition

A journal that covers human memory and learning, conceptual processes, and problem solving in a scholarly forum.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 7, October

A Basis for Generating Expectancies for Verbs from Nouns
We explore the implications of an event-based expectancy generation approach to language understanding, suggesting that one useful strategy employed by comprehenders is to generate expectations about upcoming words. We focus on two questions: (1) What...
Advance Task Preparation Reduces Task Error Rate in the Cuing Task-Switching Paradigm
Advance preparation reduces RT task-switching cost, which is thought to be evidence of preparatory control in the cuing task-switching paradigm. In the present study, we emphasize errors in relation to response speed. In two experiments, we show that...
Analogical Effects in Reading Dutch Verb Forms
Previous research has shown that the production of morphologically complex words in isolation is affected by the properties of morphologically, phonologically, or semantically similar words stored in the mental lexicon. We report five experiments with...
Bilingualism Affects Picture Naming but Not Picture Classification
Bilinguals named pictures in their dominant language more slowly (and with more errors) than did monolinguals. In contrast, bilinguals named the same pictures as quickly as did monolinguals on the fifth presentation (in Experiment 2) and classified them...
Cleaving Automatic Processes from Strategic Biases in Phonological Priming
In a phonological priming experiment using spoken Dutch words, Dutch listeners were taught varying expectancies and relatedness relations about the phonological form of target words, given particular primes. They learned to expect that, after a particular...
Direct and Indirect Effects of Action on Object Classification
We report three experiments in which name verification responses to either objects (Experiments 1 and 2) or hand movements (Experiment 3) were compared with action decisions, where participants verified whether an object is typically used in the way...
Is Inferential Reasoning Just Probabilistic Reasoning in Disguise?
Oaksford, Chater, and Larkin (2000) have suggested that people actually use everyday probabilistic reasoning when making deductive inferences. In two studies, we explicitly compared probabilistic and deductive reasoning with identical if-then conditional...
Object Location Memory: The Interplay of Multiple Representations
This article reports three experiments in which the representational nature of human object location memory was studied. The results show that multiple frames of reference can be used to encode the spatial relationships among objects. Depending on their...
On the Speed of Intuition: Intuitive Judgments of Semantic Coherence under Different Response Deadlines
Intuition is the ability to judge stimulus properties on the basis of information that is activated in memory but not consciously retrieved. We investigated one central feature of intuitive judgments-namely, their speed. Participants judged whether or...
Phonological Similarity Neighborhoods and Children's Short-Term Memory: Typical Development and Dyslexia
In this article, we explore whether structural characteristics of the phonological lexicon affect serial recall in typically developing and dyslexic children. Recent work has emphasized the importance of long-term phonological representations in supporting...
Procedural Interference in Perceptual Classification: Implicit Learning or Cognitive Complexity?
Researchers have argued that an implicit procedural-learning system underlies performance for information integration category structures, whereas a separate explicit system underlies performance for rule-based categories. One source of evidence is a...
Question Asking and Eye Tracking during Cognitive Disequilibrium: Comprehending Illustrated Texts on Devices When the Devices Break Down
The PREG model of question asking assumes that questions emerge when there is cognitive disequilibrium, as in the case of contradictions, obstacles, and anomalies. Participants read illustrated texts about everyday devices (e.g., a cylinder lock) and...
Serial Position Effects in Recognition Memory for Odors: A Reexamination
Seven experiments examined recognition memory for sequentially presented odors. Following Reed (2000), participants were presented with a sequence of odors and then required to identify an odor from the sequence in a test probe comprising 2 odors. The...
The List Strength Effect: A Contextual Competition Account
Research on the list strength effect (LSE) has shown that learning some words on a list more strongly than others impairs memory for the weakly learned words when tested with a recall task. Norman (2002) demonstrated that the LSE also occurs within the...
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