New England Reading Association Journal

Peer-reviewed journal provides articles, interviews, essays, and research reports of interest to educators. Issues investigated include literacy, classroom practice, and assessment.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 3, 2003

Building Community through Poetry
These are the lines from a poem about building community through poetry written at the culmination of a five-week poet-inresidence program, with poet julius Sokcnu held at the Colt Andrews School in Bristol, Rhode Island during the spring of 20O3.Forming...
Editorial
This issue highlights the role of parents and community as a sometimes untapped but essential resource in supporting children's literacy development. Clearly, the view that parental and community involvement can play a pivotal role in supporting children's...
Family Reading Is Something to Celebrate
How can you entice nearly 2,500 parents and children to leave their homes and drive the roads in Denver on a cold February night? The Colorado Council of the International Reading Association (CClRA) has found one way - plan a celebration of reading...
Home~school Partnership: What Works?
Research has shown with certainty that the more extensive the parent involvement, the higher the student achievement (Mor~ row, 1995; Routman, 1996; Teale & Yokata, 2000). Families that create an environment that encourages learning, and become actively...
Learning Together: Children and Adults in a School Community
Rogoff, Barbara., Carolyn Goodman Turkanis, and Leslee Bartlett. (Eds.). (2001). Learning Together: Children and Adults in a School Community. New York: Oxford University Press. 2SO pp. ISBN 0-19-516031-2(pbk.)In contrast to the Hull and Schultz book,...
Literacy in American Lives
Brandt, Deborah. (2001). Literacy in American Lives. New York: Cambridge University Press. 258 pp. ISBN 0-521-00306-7 (pbk.)In her important book Brandt gives us a picture of community in its broadest sense as she asks the question, "How has literacy...
Making the Most of Parent Partnerships to Strengthen Literacy Development: Lessons from John and Janet Poeton and Recent Research
There is widespread agreement that parents (and other family members) are critical partners in supporting children's literacy development (Taylor and Strickland, 1986; Snow et al., 1998; Tracey, 1994). It's almost like we could add "parent involvement"...
Parental Involvement for a New Century
For many educators, the role of parental involvement with schools modeled by our own parents was based on a separation of home and school. Teachers were the educational experts to whom we were entrusted during school hours. Our parents visited the school...
Parental Involvement: Key to Leaving No Child Behind in Reading
* Parental involvement: Key to leaving no child behind in reading* Family reading is something to celebrate* Parent involvement for a new century* Building community through poetry* School/Community partnerships in literacy: The Master Mentor program*...
Reading Don't Fix No Chevies: Literacy in the Lives of Young Men
Smith, Michael W. and Jeffrey D. Wilhelm. (2002). Reading Don't Fix No Chevies: Literacy in the Lives of Young Men. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 235 pp. ISBN 0-86709-509-1Smith and Wilhelm bring the students they have interviewed individually to the forefront...
School/Community Partnerships in Literacy: The Master Mentor Program
School populations are becoming more diverse while mandates call for more individualization, especially in the field of literacy. Budgets to assist with this individualization are usually not forthcoming. So what alternatives does a school have to offer?...
School's out! Bridging Out-of-School Literacies with Classroom Practice
Hull, Glynda, and Katherine Schultz. (Eds.). (2002). School's Out! Bridging Out-of-School Literacies with Classroom Practice. New York: Teachers College Press. 277pp. ISBN 0-8O77-4189-2 (pbk.)This book gives nuance to the scope of the exploration of...
Students' Views on the Purposes of Reading from Three Perspectives-Students, Teachers, and Parents
As I recently enjoyed a cappuccino and leisurely scanned the NY Times in my local chain bookstore, I overheard a young voice eagerly reading aloud a J.K. Rawling's book to another child. I estimated that the reader was probably in first grade so I was...
Technology in Early Childhood Literacy Development: Family Literacy and Technology
Adrian, 4-years old, and Alexandra, 2.5 years old, are typical, lively siblings who play together but insist on their independence; are usually obedient but do stand up for themselves; share but not always willingly; and frequently play with the computer.Alexandra,...