The Public Interest

Public Interest is a magazine specializing in Politics topics.

Articles from No. 133, Fall

Civic Education Reconsidered
We are approaching the end of an era in educational philosophy. From the middle of the 1960s until today, the reigning orthodoxy among educational theorists has been one of hostility to civic education, understood as the attempt to inculcate an appreciation...
Does Immigration Harm the Poor?
Partly as a result of reforms undertaken in the 1960s, the United States is currently experiencing the largest sustained wave of immigration in its history. Each year, the United States admits between 700,000 and 900,000 legal immigrants; additionally,...
Getting Serious about School Discipline
In April 1998, a 15-year-old female student at Roosevelt High School in Yonkers, New York, was upset because her social-studies teacher, Dawn Jawrower, had telephoned her parents to express concern over her poor academic performance. The student packed...
Is America an Experiment?
Some of the most valuable work in the field of American history these days is being done by the men and women who restore and preserve historical sites. Though such work is often disdained as antiquarian or subscholarly by academic historians, it in...
The Limits of Campaign Spending Limits
Political indignation engenders constitutional excess. Such was the case in 1974 when Congress, hot with anger over Watergate, delivered a beating to First Amendment rights with a set of new provisions to the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA). The...
Washington versus School Reform
"Promiscuous" is an overused word in Washington these days, but it aptly describes the trend in federal education policy - both at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and on Capitol Hill. The 1990s have seen the wanton transformation of innumerable education fads...