The Public Interest

Public Interest is a magazine specializing in Politics topics.

Articles from No. 123, Spring

All Quiet on the (Post) Western Front?
Class criticized poem for its lack of a woman's perspective. Note the unconscious gender privileging - his terror, his glory, his phallic monuments. - A student's notes of a class on Yeats's "Meru," from Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater. Multiculturalism"...
Doing Methadone Right
Heroin looks like it is here to stay. Since the 1960s, millions of Americans have used heroin. Most stopped, with or without treatment, at some point. But there are an estimated half-million Americans addicted to heroin and a comparable number using...
Gambling Away Our Moral Capital
DURING the past generation, there has been a dramatic expansion of legalized gambling. Beginning with New Hampshire in 1964, 37 states and the District of Columbia have instituted lotteries. As recently as 1988, only two states allowed casino gambling....
Legalization Madness
Frustrated by the government's apparent inability to reduce the supply of illegal drugs on the streets of America, and disquieted by media accounts of innocents victimized by drug-related violence, some policy makers are convinced that the "war on...
Medicalizing Character
Hailed as "the most far-reaching legislation ever enacted against discrimination of people with disabilities," the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) extends the civil-rights protections of individuals with disabilities to employment, public accommodations,...
Monuments in an Age without Heroes
It was not much noted, or indeed noted at all, that the Million Man March in Washington last November took place in front of what was described in the 1937 Works Progress Administration (WPA) guide to Washington as the "the largest and most costly...
Orphanages: The Real Story
When the word "orphanage" is used, Americans typically cringe, imagining that the children who grew up in one had the crudest and cruelest of childhoods. Harsh, unrelenting critics of orphanages continue to play on these popular images of orphanages,...
The Cultural Contradictions of Conservatism
A poetic episode in our national history occurred July 4, 1826. On that 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, the author of that founding document, Thomas Jefferson, died. So did John Adams, who did as much as anyone to produce the occasion...
Whatever Happened to the American Way of Death?
A few decades ago, we knew perfectly well what to make of the American way of death. it was overly sentimentalized, highly commercialized, and, above all, excessively expensive. We knew all this be cause our British friends, both visitors and expatriates,...