American Annals of the Deaf

The American Annals of the Deaf is a journal focusing on the education of the deaf. Founded in 1847, it is published quarterly with spring, summer, fall and winter issues. The journal is published by the Conference of Educational Administrators Serving the Deaf at Gallaudet University Press. Subjects include: Hearing and Speech. The editor is Donald F. Moores.

Articles from Vol. 142, No. 3, July

Americanization in Our Schools for the Deaf
On every side of us nowadays we hear the expression, Americanization, which is calling more and more for a national spirit peculiar to our western temperament and liberty. Originally every one of us, except the aboriginal Indians, has come from some...
An Investigation concerning the Value of the Oral Method
We announced in the preface to volume xiv of our Annie our intention to make a careful study of the results of teaching the deaf by the oral method. It is a matter of considerable interest, putting away all spirit of assumption or disparagement, to become...
Bi-Bi to MCE?
Unlike in any other time in the education of deaf children, a stronger instructional role for American Sign Language (ASL) is being pushed vigorously. In the United States and Canada, this movement has found its greatest support from linguistic analysis...
Editorial: The American Annals of the Deaf, 1847-1947
One hundred years ago this fall the members of the faculty of the American School for the Deaf, in Hartford, Connecticut, founded a Journal devoted to the education and the general welfare of the deaf. Although it received the hearty approval of the...
From the Library of Congress to Powrie V. Doctor, 1947
THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington 25, D.C. REFERENCE DEPARTMENT Division of General Reference and Bibliography September 30, 1947 Dear Mr. Doctor: Your letter of September 14, 1947, addressed to Dr. Evans, has been referred to the General Reference...
Is the Sign-Language Used to Excess in Teaching Deaf-Mutes?
There are often ideas suggested for consideration, which seem to carry absurdity on their very face. One would smile, who should be asked if the art of swimming could not be acquired without venturing into the water, or if the deaf and dumb were not...
Mistaken Investigations concerning the Value of the Oral Method
Alfred Binet and his fellow helper, Dr. Simon, have made an investigation as to the value of the oral method, and have published a report of it in their well-known review, I Annie psychologique. In the minds of the authors the resuits of their investigations...
Must the Sign-Language Go?
Language should be subordinate to thought, not thought to language. -Henry Drummond One evening last March I sat among the students of the College and enjoyed with them a lecture by one of my colleagues, on "Man's First Steps Towards Civilization." This...
Notions of the Deaf and Dumb before Instruction, Especially in Regard to Religious Subjects
Especially in Regard to Religious Subjects That, as man had a beginning on the earth, so language also had a begin ning, is the starting point of the inquiry. In the present stage of psychological science, we may assume as a fact proved by all experience,...
On the Natural Language of Signs and Its Value and Uses in the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb
We have considered, in the preceding number, the origin, universality, and some of the advantages of the natural language of signs originally employed by the deaf and dumb; expanded and improved by themselves and their teachers; and used, more or less,...
Professional Preparation and Advancement of Deaf Teachers
A consideration of the problem of the preparation and advancement of the deaf teacher must of necessity wait upon such questions as these: Do conditions indicate a need for the deaf teacher? If so, is the need a sporadic or a stable need? To what extent...
Psycholinguistics and Deafness
In the summer of 1967, American educators of the deaf observed two significant milestones. It was a year which commemorated establishment of the first school for the deaf 150 years before in Hartford, Connecticut, and which celebrated the 100th anniversary...
Reflections of a Deaf-Mute before Education
In consequence of the loss of my hearing in infancy,* I was debarred from enjoying the advantages which children in the full possession of their senses derive from the exercises of the common primary school, from the everyday talk of their school-fellows...
Signs and Manual Communication Systems
Selection, Standardization, and Development Frank Caccamise' Robert Ayers Karen Finch Marilyn Mitchell NATIONAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF, ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY The trend toward the inclusion of manual communication as part of a "total"...
The Educational Preparation and Oral Teachers of the Deaf
Deaf children are taught orally in public residential schools in forty-four states and in day schools and day classes in twenty-six states. All oral teachers of the deaf teach the same kind of children and teach approximately the same things to these...
The Influence of Early Manual Communication on the Linguistic Development of Deaf Children
Part I I. INTRODUCTION Educators of the deaf for centuries have been preoccupied with the modes of communication in the classroom that will best serve the deaf student's education and general social adjustment. The concern of many has centered on whether...
The Status of the Preschool Deaf Child
The problem of this study was to find out, as nearly as may be, from the state residential, public day, and denominational and private schools for the deaf in the United States and Canada just what is being done for the pre-school deaf child of to-day....
The Value of the Sign-Language to the Deaf
A few isolated instances are recorded, previous to the last century, of deaf persons who, under favor able conditions, have developed for their own use a measurably complete language of signs. But it was only toward the middle of the eighteenth century...
To the Board of Directors of the American Asylum, 1847
To the President and Directors of the American Asylum Gentlemen: The Faculty of the American Asylum, having had their attention called by the Principal, to the expediency of commencing a periodical to be devoted to questions connected with the general...
Words Recognized as Units: Systematic Signs
Friend Porter:-I send you this letter for insertion in the January number, if it is not too late. I read with interest the paper of Mr. Jacobs, in the October number, treating of the signs in the order of the words; and also Mr. Burnet's, with your reply,...

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