American Annals of the Deaf

The American Annals of the Deaf is a journal focusing on the education of the deaf. Founded in 1847, it is published quarterly with spring, summer, fall and winter issues. The journal is published by the Conference of Educational Administrators Serving the Deaf at Gallaudet University Press. Subjects include: Hearing and Speech. The editor is Donald F. Moores.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 4, Fall

Are We Hammering Square Pegs into Round Holes? an Investigation of the Meta-Analyses of Reading Research with Students Who Are D/deaf or Hard of Hearing and Students Who Are Hearing
Children who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing (d/Dhh)1 are not hearing children who cannot hear. But who are they? How do they think? Particularly, for the interests of the present study, how do they learn to read? Is reading the same for them as for hearing...
Early Visual Language Exposure and Emergent Literacy in Preschool Deaf Children: Findings from a National Longitudinal Study
In the study of literacy in deaf1 children, many questions remain regarding the aspects of development, communi - cation, language, and education that contribute to success. Considerable evidence is now mounting suggesting that exposure to a rich language...
In Memoriam: E. Ross Stuckless
Murad, S. (2014). In memoriam: E. Ross Stuckless. American Annals of the Deaf, 159(4), 315-316.Dr. E. Ross Stuckless, longtime faculty member of Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, died July 21 in Connecticut,...
In Memoriam: Robert F. Panara
McGrain, V (2014). In memoriam: Robert F. Panara. American Annals of the Deaf, 159(4), 13-14.Robert F. Panara, much-beloved professor emeritus at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), author, poet, histo- rian, international authority on deaf figures...
In Praise of Doubt and Systematic Inquiry
Paul, P V (2014). In praise of doubt and systematic inquiry. American Annals of the Deaf 159(4), 305-311.The articles in this volume represent the first segment of a two-part special issue on English reading development for individuals who are d/Deaf...
Is Reading Different for Deaf Individuals? Reexamining the Role of Phonology
In the present article, we revisit a question Hanson (1989) posed a quartercentury years ago: "Is reading different for deaf individuals?" (p. 85). Hanson suggested that the answer to this question appears to be both yes and no, and she indicated that...
Literacy and Linguistic Development in Bilingual Deaf Children: Implications of the "And" for Phonological Processing
Research is widely available outlining the factors that contribute to successful language and literacy acquisition in hearing populations, both monolingual and bilingual (see reviews in Ehri, 2005, and Grabe, 2009, respectively). Most current theories...
Reading and Deaf Individuals: Perspectives on the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis
On the opening page of his novel Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy writes, "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way" (Tolstoy, 1875-1877/2001, p. 1). This sentence is widely interpreted as meaning that a marriage has to...
The Importance of Visual Stimulus as a Component of Audition Stimulus in the Aural/Oral (Re)Habilitation of Children/Clients with Hearing Loss
Call it visual stimulus or call it speechreading, it merits equal promotion with audition stimuli (auditory training) in the habilitation of children with hearing loss and the rehabilitation of clients with hearing loss. This decades-old approach to...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.