The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online)

The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online) is an academic journal focusing on Pan African Studies

Articles from Vol. 4, No. 6, September

Aesthetic Foundations & Activist Strategies of Intervention in Rickerby Hinds' Buckworld One
Abstract: The aesthetic, cultural, and human terrain covered in Rickerby Hinds' Buckworld One illuminates diverse geographies of human existence. The elements of krumping, spoken word poetry, and video projections strategically instigate an activist...
African Dance as Healing Modality throughout the Diaspora: The Use of Ritual and Movement to Work through Trauma
Abstract: In the African worldview, dance is a conduit of individual and community healing. African conceptualizations of illness and health integrate social, spiritual, physical and mental realms, all of which are impacted by trauma. This paper will...
A Terminology of Difference: Making the Case for Black Dance in the 21st Century and Beyond
AbstractThe history of the term Black dance is explored with particular attention to contemporary and ongoing debates on its meaning, use and application. A summary of important historical and current uses of the term are engaged and explored in depth....
CaribFunk Technique: Afro-Caribbean Feminism, Caribbean Dance and Popular Culture
Abstract: CaribFunk technique, by definition, is a 21st century mutation of foundational dance, fitness, and somatic paradigms. CaribFunk explores the power of the hip wine, female strength, liberation, sensuality and virtuosic ability. I attempt to...
Dancing with the Ghost of Minstrelsy: A Case Study of the Marginalization and Continued Survival of Rhythm Tap
Abstract: This article examines the obstacles faced by rhythm tap to gain artistic acceptance throughout seminal periods of its evolution as an entertainment art form. The legitimating of the art is discussed in consideration of its marginal, historical...
Dancin' on the Shoulders of Our Ancestors: An Introduction
Since the beginning of civilization, African dance, coupled with African music, has played a significant role in the daily lives of African people throughout the continent of Africa. In fact, African dance is so important to the everyday lives of African...
Final I Just Want to Get My Groove On: An African American Experience with Race, Racism, and the White Aesthetic in Dance
AbstractDance, like other sports, operates through the frame of cultural identity. However, while there may be freedom in bodily movement, the body is constrained when it comes to who is able to dance. Oftentimes dancers do not fit into a certain racial...
From Kitchen Mechanics to "Jubilant Spirits of Freedom": Black, Working-Class Women Dancing the Lindy Hop
Abstract: This essay examines the ways in which the Lindy Hop provided a means of escape, freedom, and rebellion for Black, working-class women during the swing era. Rudolph Fisher's "The Lindy Hop," Ann Petry's "In Darkness and Confusion," Ann Petry's...
Hoodoo Religion and American Dance Traditions: Rethinking the Ring Shout
Abstract: When one considers the history of American dance traditions one rarely thinks about its possible relationship to the local African American "Sanctified" or fundamentalist church described in works such as James Baldwin's Go Tell it On the Mountain....
"I Don't Want to Do African . . . What about My Technique?:" Transforming Dancing Places into Spaces in the Academy
Abstract: Building off of the work of dance scholar Brenda Dixon Gottschild, the author argues that the American dancing body is a fusion of West African, ballet, and modern dance techniques. Yet, curricula in collegiate dance departments throughout...
In Memory of Queen Nzinga Ratibisha Heru
Queen Nzinga Ratibisha Heru was the international president of the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations (ASCAC), and co-founder and executive director of Rivers Run Deep Institute and editor-in-chief of SEREK, an African centered...
The Black Male Dancer Physique: An Object of White Desirability
Abstract: The black male's physique streamed into Western consciousness as a desirable, yet dangerous exotic being. These perceptions eventually contributed to the objectification and exploitation of black male dancing bodies. This discourse will illustrate...
The Kilumi Rain Dance in Modern Kenya
Abstract: Black dance is a fluid, vibrant, colorful, and changing form that is situational, temporal, and spatial. It does not, and will not fit into a neat category or box. Black dance is used in different ways and for different reasons. In Kenya, Kilumi...
Theorizing Connectivities: African American Women in Concert Dance
Abstract: This essay explores genealogies of Black women's presence in American modern dance to theorize connectivity as a methodology to appreciate their creative work. The legacies of more familiar dance artists, including Pearl Primus and Katherine...
The Saga of African Dance and Black Studies Departments
Abstract: In 1964, President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, which mandated courses on Black and Minority studies into the curriculum on a nationwide basis. Failure to do so would cause the loss of federal funding. At the time, I was an undergraduate...
When the Past Dances into the Future: An Interview with African-Centered Dance Scholar, Dr. Kariamu Welsh
I was first introduced to Dr. Kariamu Welsh when I was a doctoral student in African American Studies at Temple University in the fall of 2004. As a formally trained dancer, it was a natural fit for me to enroll in an African Dance class as part of my...
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