Southeastern Archaeology

Southeastern Archaeology is a magazine focusing on Social Sciences

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, 2014

Foundations of the Cades Pond Culture in North-Central Florida: The River Styx Site (8Al458)
The River Styx site (8AL458) was a Middle Woodland ceremonial center (ca. A.D. 100 to 300) in northcentral Florida that consisted of a low sand burial mound surrounded by a 100-m-long horseshoe-shaped earthen embankment (Bullen and Hemmings 1972; Hemmings...
Insights from the Analysis of Angel Mounds Pottery Trowels
Pottery trowels are mushroom-shaped fired-clay artifacts archaeologists frequently associate with the manufacturing of pottery vessels by various indigenous peoples of the pre-Columbian Southeast and Midwest (Dunn 2011; Kellar 1967; Steponaitis 1983)....
Soapstone Vessel Chronology and Function in the Southern Appalachians of Eastern Tennessee: The Apple Barn Site (40Bt90) Assemblage
Soapstone is a soft, talc-rich metamorphic rock located among the eastern Appalachian Mountains and western Piedmont along a beltway extending from eastern Alabama to northern New England (Chidester et al. 1964; Greene 1995). While the mineral form is...
Taking Stock of Social Theory in Southeastern Archaeology
The articles collected here were originally presented as papers in a plenary session on archaeological theory sponsored by the Southeastern Archaeological Conference, offered on November 8, 2012, at the annual meeting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. On two...
What I Believe about the Useful Diversity of Theory in Southeastern Archaeology
It is an honor to join this group of scholars commenting upon the current state of archaeological theory in the Southeast, not to mention the greats who are our predecessors (e.g., Watson 1990). Our plenary session organizer, Jim Knight, said that his...
What I Believe: A Memoir of Processualism to Neohistorical Anthropology
Two Vignettes1. At the SEAC meeting in Little Rock back in 2006, I happened to be standing behind Jim Knight in the food line for BBQ at Toltec. We were discussing odds and ends, when he turned to me and said, "One of my grad students at Alabama recently...
What I Believe: Doing Archaeology as a Feminist
My background differs from that of many Southeastern archaeologists. I'm a suburban, Jewish Yankee who first met archaeology in the Egyptian galleries of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. At age 31, when I interviewed for a job in Charlotte, I had been...
What I Believe: Reflections on Historical and Political Ecology as Research Frameworks in Southeastern Archaeology
Research themes centering on human-environment interaction have a long history in the writings of Southeastern archaeologists (e.g., Caldwell 1958). Indeed, it is still a primary concern among many contemporary researchers. However, while our fascination...
What I Believe: Structure and the Problem of Macrosociality
When Jim Knight invited each of us to participate in the SEAC 2012 plenary session "What I Believe," one of his challenges was to offer, in twenty minutes no less, "your best understanding of how human sociality fundamentally works, and how this helps...
What I Believe: Taking Up the Serpents of Social Theory and Southeastern Archaeology
When Jim Knight asked me to participate in a SEAC session in which all the papers were to be titled "What I Believe," I began envisioning a tent revival with testifying, tongues speaking, and prophetic utterances. I was raised in the southeastern Tennessee...
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