Texas Journal of Women and the Law

Texas Journal of Women and the Law is an academic journal focusing on Texas Women and the Law

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 1, Fall

Abortion, Self-Defense, and Involuntary Servitude
I. IntroductionAs the manuscripts for the present issue of this journal were being prepared for final publication, the U.S. Senate passed a ban on so-called "late-term abortions." This is the (surprisingly neutral) term generally offered for abortions...
A Subversive Act: The Americans with Disabilities Act, Foucault, and an Alternative Ethic of Care at the Global Workplace
I. IntroductionAn ethic of care should not be considered just a feminist morality. As a critique of rights, an ethic of care also critiques both American liberalism and capitalism. After all, rights are at the very heart of liberalism and capitalism....
Gender: An (Un)useful Category of Prescriptive Negotiation Analysis?*
I. IntroductionPractitioners and scholars who desire to bring a feminist agenda to the field of negotiation have almost exclusively embraced an account of feminist theory that grounds gender in male-female distinction. Skills considered benefits or liabilities...
Pedagogical Subversion in Clinical Teaching: The Women & the Law Clinic and the Intellectual Property Clinic as Legal Archaeology
Legal pedagogy provides an important site for the subversion of dominant conceptions of law. For more than two decades, feminist law teachers have sought to enable our students to understand how the law interacts with social power to shape women's experience...
Roundtable Discussion: Is Subversion Subversive?
Zipporah Wiseman*:We have talked and tried to identify key questions that have arisen in the remarkable panels that we have all heard in the last two days. And what I am going to do is try to roll it all into one question, which is really six or seven,...
Subversive Moments: Challenging the Traditions of Constitutional History
I. IntroductionFor the past five years we have been making our own subversive intervention into the law school curriculum. Courses in "Gender and the Law" are now common. Our course, "Gender and Constitutional History," is a variation that we have found...
Unearthing Subversion with Legal Archaeology
I. IntroductionIt is by now well-documented that the experience of attending law school creates among law students feelings of alienation and dehumanization.1 There is both anecdotal2 and empirical data3 supporting this psychological battering. In fact,...
Women's Citizenship and the Problem of Legal Personhood in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s
I. IntroductionSecond wave feminism remade citizenship for American women. Both the campaigns of liberal feminists to achieve new laws and judicial understandings, and the more diffuse cultural changes inspired by radical feminism, contributed to the...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.