Japanese Journal of Religious Studies

Japanese Journal of Religious Studies is a magazine focusing on Japanese Religious Studies

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 1, 2008

All Roads Come from Zen: Busshinji as a Reference to Buddhism
This paper explores the historical role of Busshinji temple as a center of Buddhism in Brazil for non-Japanese. Busshinji was established by Sotoshu as a betsuin (branch temple) in the city of São Paulo in 1956. Drawing on interviews with early adherents,...
Editors' Introduction: Japanese Religions in Brazil
(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)THE DATE of the publication of this special issue on "Japanese Religions in Brazil" coincides with the centenary festivities of Japanese immigration to Brazil. On a number of occasions throughout the year,...
Intellectuals and Japanese Buddhism in Brazil
This study concentrates on the discovery of Japanese Buddhism by Brazilian intellectuals as a group of spiritual practices and as a body of spiritual wisdom. The study has been realized through readings and meetings with Japanese Buddhist monks and/or...
Japanese Prayer below the Equator: How Brazilians Believe in the Church of World Messianity
Hideaki Matsuoka, Japanese Prayer below the Equator: How Brazilians Believe in the Church of World Messianity Lanham: Lexington Books, 2007. 173 pp. $60.00, hardcover. isbn-10 0-7391-1379-8 and isbn-13 978-0-7391-1379-0.Hideaki Matsuoka trained and actually...
Japanese Religions in and beyond the Japanese Diaspora
Ronan Alves Pereira and Hideaki Matsuoka, Japanese Religions in and beyond the Japanese Diaspora Berkeley, California: Institute for East Asian Studies, University of California Press, 2007. ix + 251 pp. $22.00 paper, isbn 1-55729-087-3.THIS BOOK contains...
The Development of Japanese New Religions in Brazil and Their Propagation in a Foreign Culture
This article will examine Omoto, Konkokyo, and Rissho Koseikai as examples of New Religions among Brazilians of Japanese descent, and Sekai Kyuseikyo, Soka Gakkai, and Reiyukai as Japanese new religions that have expanded through propagation to Brazilians...
The Failed Prophecy of Shinto Nationalism and the Rise of Japanese Brazilian Catholicism
This article deals with the main religious transition that accomplished the redefinition of Japanese Brazilian identity after the Second World War. State Shinto was the main world view of the Japanese immigrants in Brazil until the 1950s, playing a key...
"The Last Missionary to Leave the Temple Should Turn off the Light": Sociological Remarks on the Decline of Japanese "Immigrant" Buddhism in Brazil
Empirical data indicate that the so-called "Buddhism of yellow color" that is predominantly associated with Japanese "immigrant" Buddhism, is constantly in decline in terms of "explicit" adherents. After some methodological observations, this article...
The Transplantation of Soka Gakkai to Brazil: Building "The Closest Organization to the Heart of Ikeda-Sensei"
Up to the 1980s, Buddhist influence in Brazil was, at best, exiguous and marginal. The Buddhist Society of Brazil, established in 1923 by Theosophists, was short-lived, and was only reestablished in 1955 with little public visibility and activity. In...
Zen in Brazil: The Quest for Cosmopolitan Modernity
Cristina Rocha, Zen in Brazil: The Quest for Cosmopolitan Modernity Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press 2006. 256 pp. Hardcover, $37:00. isbn-10 0-8248-2976-x; isbn-13 978-0-8248-2976-6.Cristina Rocha is a Brazilian researcher engaged in the study...

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.