PSYART

PSYART is a magazine focusing on Arts

Articles from January 2006

Dr. C. G. Jung Visits the House of Mirth
Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth (1905) presents psychological disintegration in the characterization of the novel's beautiful heroine Miss. Lily Bart. This paper applies a Jungian analysis to study the causes and effects of Lily Bart's psychological...
Getting the 'H' out of Jo(h)nson
The essay looks at characterization in the plays of Ben Jonson as phobic projective behaviors that can best be understood using theories of narcissism and Kleinian object-relations theory. Jonson exhibited what are today clear symptoms of narcissistic...
Integritas and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Incomplete Artworks
This paper examines how the notion of integritas, central to a Thomistic philosophy of art and aesthetics, applies to works of art which are corrupt or incomplete due to missing parts. Using the Laocoön as a primary example, the author argues that the...
Jesus and Object-Use: A Winnicottian Account of the Resurrection Myth
This paper accounts for the power of the resurrection myth in terms of Winnicott's theories of early development, particularly the "development of the capacity for concern" and the idea of "object-use" that grew out of it. The myth of the resurrection...
Jokes and Their Relation to the Uncanny: The Comic, the Horrific, and Pleasure in Audition and Romero's Dead Films
This paper explores the relationship between Freud's theories of the comic and the horrific, as presented in Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious and The Uncanny. Freudian interpretation of horror films and literature generally involves the notion...
"Kubla Khan": Genesis of an Archetype
At least partly dictated by a dream, "Kubla Khan," whose structure, in spite of appearances, is very coherent, constitutes a superb metaphor of language and heralds the advent of psychoanalysis. Its dramatic development-fusion, loss and hallucinated...
Literary Morphology: Nine Propositions in a Naturalist Theory of Form
Naturalist literary theory conceives of literature as an adaptive behavioral realm grounded in the capacities of the human brain. In the course of human history literature itself has undergone an evolution that has produced many kinds of literary work....
Literary Parallels Stemming from a Resemblance in the Authors' Creative Development: The Extraordinary Similarities between Amos Oz's the Same Sea and James Joyce's Finnegans Wake
This paper presents outstanding parallels between the books The Same Sea by Amos Oz, the well-known Israeli writer, and James Joyce's masterpiece Finngeans Wake. The parallels between the works - in terms of plot, structure, ideas, language, style and...
Mourning at the Mother's Breast: On Death and Weaning in Tennyson's in Memoriam
In Section 44 of Tennyson's In Memoriam, the poem's speaker evokes the image of an infant at the mother's breast, an image that is the key to an understanding of the link the poem makes between language and touch. The speaker's recognition of the inadequacy...
Narratives of Disorder-Disorders of Narrative
What is order, what is disorder? Consecution of temporal events and causality are normally regarded as prerequisites for understanding narratives. What happens when narratives become disorderly by violating the principles of consecution? One approach...
Perspectivism-A Powerful Cognitive Metaphor
Perspectivism, a version of what Solms and Turnbull call "dual-aspect monism," denotes here the ability of individual persons to shuttle between objective and subjective points of view, positions represented by science on the one hand and by religion,...
R.D. Laing's Language of Experience
The radical psychiatrist R.D. Laing (1927-1989) was an accomplished author with an extensive philosophical knowledge that informed his ideas on reading, writing, and interpretation. Laing argues that psychiatry should be modeled on skilful textual exegesis...
Style, Identity, Free Association, and the Brain
Artists and readers demonstrate persistent styles. Previously, I have explained this phenomenon by a general model of humans' functioning. A theme-and-variations identity unique to an individual sets standards for physiological and cultural feedback...
Suicidal Risk in Lives of Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath
Both Woolf and Plath experienced depression during their life and were hospitalized in mental institutions, but still there is a lot of similar as well as different risk and protective factors in their lives forming the individual course of a suicidal...
The Silence of Madness in "Signs and Symbols" by Vladimir Nabokov
In this paper, I try to wonder about the way madness and literature can be linked and/or separated, through the analysis of a short story by the Russian American writer Vladimir Nabokov entitled "Signs and Symbols" as both literature and madness are...
"The Truth of My Being in Gesture and Movement": The Ego and the Body in Modernist Writing on Dance in Isadora Duncan's My Life
The paper examines Isadora Duncan's revolutionary dance style in the context of modernism's backlash against the machine age. Duncan reached back to the Greek chorus and Greek mythology for a way of harmonizing the individual and society. Her autobiography,...
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