Irish University Review: a journal of Irish Studies

Irish University Review: a journal of Irish Studies is a magazine specializing in Social Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 2, Autumn-Winter

'All Them Rocks in the Sea': Ulysses as Immram
Heureux qui, comme Ulysse, a fait un beau voyage... - Joachim du Bellay, Les Regrets XXXI In the sixteenth, or 'Eumaeus' episode of Ulysses, Bloom and Stephen encounter D.B. Murphy of Carrigloe, a seaman just off 'The threemaster Rosevean from...
Brian Friel: Staging the Struggle with Nationalism
The problem is not simply the 'selfhood' of the nation as opposed to the otherness of other nations. We are confronted with the nation split within itself, articulating the heterogeneity of its population. (1) Homi Bhabha I The critical responses...
'By Escaping and [Leaving] a Mark': Authority and the Writing Subject of the Poetry of Medbh McGuckian
'A poem dreams of being written', writes Medbh McGuckian, 'without the pronoun "I"'. (1) McGuckian's 'I' may, in fact, be among the most highly contested and theoretically elusive in contemporary poetry This particular inquiry aims to participate in...
Exit/Entrance
With this issue of the Irish University Review, my tenth, I step down as editor of what I have always regarded as the outstanding journal in the crowded field of Irish Studies. I have very much enjoyed the five years, feel I have made my contribution...
IASIL Bibliography Bulletin for 2001
The Bibliography Subcommittee continues to produce the IASIL Bibliography with unflagging energy. Lis Christensen and Gerd Bjorhovde, who have provided the Danish and Norwegian material respectively for many years, retire from the committee this...
List of Books Received
Augusteijn, Joost, The Irish Revolution, 1913-1923. London: Palgrave, 2002. xiii + 248 pages. No price given. Brannigan, John, Brendan Behan: Cultural Nationalism and the Revisionist Writer. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 188 pages. EUR 40.00...
Queering Knowledge in Flann O'Brien's the Third Policeman
Critics of Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman (1967) have habitually misread gender and sexuality in the novel's notorious bicycle sex-scene. They have both taken for granted that the bicycle with which the male narrator has an intimate sexual tryst...
The Predicament of Individuality in Angela's Ashes
Since publication in 1996, Angela's Ashes, by Frank McCourt, has already elicited substantial critical response. Brief notice of three such evaluations will indicate the range of reception. Peter Lenz approaches the memoir in terms of relevant motifs...
The Roman Novel in Irish Writers
1 While much attention has been given to the appropriation of Greek tragedy by contemporary Irish poets and dramatists, (1) and the Homeric parallels to Joyce's Ulysses have long been noted, (2) the impact of the Roman novels of Petronius and Apuleius...
The Weather in Japan: Tact and Tension in Michael Longley's New Elegies
Michael Longley's recent elegies strike a painstaking balance between loss and gain. Their taut, paradoxical interplay between wound and balm builds upon the even-handed response his work has always made to death. As early as 'Wounds' of An Exploded...
'They Raigne Ouer Change, and Doe Their States Maintaine': Change, Stasis, and Postcoloniality in Frank McGuinness's Mutabilitie
... all things stedfastnes doe hate And changed be: yet being rightly wayd They are not changed from their first estate; But by their change their being doe dilate: And turning to themselues at length againe, Doe worke...