Philip Roth Studies

A peer-reviewed journal devoted to the literary exploration of this prolific contemporary novelist. It publishes writing pertaining entirely or in part to Philip Roth, his fiction, and his literary and cultural significance.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring

A Psychopathology of Everyday Women: Psychoanalytic Aesthetics and Gender Politics in Letting Go and “the Psychoanalytic Special”
FEMINISM AND PSYCHOANALYSIS"The fact is that to [him] [. . .] women [are] a strange, inferior, less-than- human species. He [sees] them as childlike dolls, who existed in terms only of man's love, to love man and serve his needs" (Friedan 108). This...
A Response
I am grateful to the editors of Philip Roth Studies for giving me the chance to respond to the review of Diasporas of the Mind: Jewish and Postcolonial Writing and the Nightmare of History (2014), published in Fall 2016 by Professor Henry Schwarz. I...
In the Roth Archives: The Evolution of Philip Roth’s Kepesh Trilogy 1
As the least narratively coherent of Roth's recurrent narrators, David Kepesh is also one of Roth's most enigmatic characters. Perhaps this is excusable; Roth wrote the Kepesh novels during vastly different eras, and, as such, they reflect vastly different...
Introduction Philip Roth’s Transdisciplinary Translation
In the fall of 2015, we discussed what it would mean to bring together some of the most respected minds in Roth Studies, scholars who have been writing about Roth for over a decade, with scholars just starting out. The goal was to unite everyone to attend...
Not Getting It: The Allure of the Counterlife in Early and Late Roth
At the close of Philip Roth's 1959 novella, "Goodbye, Columbus," Neil Klugman, walking alone against the dark night of Harvard Yard, confronts his reflection in the glass front of the building that houses the library, a sanctuary available only to those...
The Place of the “Aesthetic” in Zuckerman Unbound: Roth’s Conversation with Kierkegaard
Philip Roth's frequent references to other writers create links that expand the themes of each novel. The intertextual relationships are part of a larger history, which begins to be a universe in itself within its own aesthetic world.One of these aesthetic...
Trauma, Ethics and Psychoanalysis in Philip Roth’s Sabbath’s Theater 1
Philip Roth's Sabbath's Theater (1995), a late work that registers a marked ethical turn in the author's canon, brings a new dimension to contemporary American fiction in its engagement with human consciousness, temporality, and traumatic memory. It...
Zeno 2.0: A Psychoanalytic Dialogue between Zeno’s Conscience and Portnoy’s Complaint
Any reader of Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint (1969) who is familiar with Italo Svevo's most famous novel, Zeno's Conscience (1928), will instantly notice an uncanny resemblance between them. Yet Roth never talks about Svevo- neither in his writings,...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.