The American (Washington, DC)

An academic journal covering economics, foreign policy, law, social policy, regulation, politics, public opinion, and media from a conservative perspective. Theme-based issues examine a single topic in depth. Recurring features include a digest that summa

Articles from Vol. 2, No. 4, July-August

America's Other Immigration Crisis: The United States Has a Pressing Immigration Problem. but It's Not the One You Hear about on Cable Chat Shows. Vivek Wadhwa Explains How We Are Bringing the World's Smartest Minds to Our Shores, Training Them, and Then Pushing Them Away
From his early childhood, Sanjay Mavinkurve dreamed of coming to America and making it big. So his parents, who are from India, sent him to boarding school in Cleveland, Ohio when he was 14. He did so well that he gained a scholarship to Harvard, where...
A More Secure Workplace: Economist Steven J. Davis Argues That There Has Been a Long-Term Decline in the Risk of Job Loss Facing American Workers.'
As we went to press, it was unclear whether the U.S. economy had entered (or was approaching) a recession. The first-quarter GBP numbers showed anemic growth, but growth nonetheless. Whatever happens in 2008, many Americans believe that the risk...
An Energy Policy We Can Stick To: Andy Grove, Former Chairman of Intel, Applies His Analytic Mind, Steeped in Business and Science, to National Energy Policy-And Comes Up with a Solution Whose Goals Are 'Stickiness' and 'Resilience' and Whose Power Is Electric
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Twenty-five years ago, when I was CEO of Intel, I had an unusual experience while visiting a customer. It was during a period of tight availability of microprocessors, our main product. This was not an unusual state of affairs....
A 'Windfall' of Unintended Consequences: As Motorists Feel Pain at the Pump, a Misguided Policy Gets Another Hearing
Gas prices and energy company profits have both been soaring, which means it's time for another round of populist flailing on Capitol Hill. In particular, the idea of a "Windfall Profits Tax" (WPT) is once again all the rage. And why not? Just look...
Bear Necessities? the Bailout of Bear Stearns Has Triggered Calls in Washington for Stepped-Up Oversight of the Securities Industry. Peter J. Wallison Explains Why This Rush to Regulate Ignores the Lessons of History
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] One of the best titles ever devised for a book about Washington was Lawrence F. O'Brien's No Final Victories. Washington is really like that. Some policy goals lie dormant for years and--like ancient spores found in an archaeological...
Conventional Wisdom: Karlyn Bowman Offers a Handy Guide to America's Political Conventions Both Past and Present
In September 1831, the Anti-Masonic Party held the nation's first political convention in Baltimore. One hundred and sixteen delegates attended from 13 states. The Democrats held their first convention in 1832 and the Republicans in 1856, making the...
Doomed to Repeat It? A Newly Dominant Country Can Disturb a Region's Balance of Power. It Happened in Europe a Century Ago. Is It Happening in Asia Today? Robert Haddick Argues That in Order to Figure out China, We Should Study the Kaiser
China's emergence over the past three decades as a global power has an eerie resemblance to the arrival of another global power a century ago. In the mid-1860s, the German nation was scattered among many small and weak states. Unification under Otto...
Food Fight: Rising Food Prices Have Caused Hardship in the Developing World. Robert Paarlberg Argues That It's Time to Embrace Genetically Modified Foods
At a time of soaring global food prices, it is distressing to see such stubborn resistance to genetically engineered agricultural crops, also known as genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or genetically modified (GM) foods. These foods could help...
From the Editor
Dear Reader: A few months ago, Andy Grove, the former CEO of Intel, called Jim Glassman, my predecessor as editor of THE AMERICAN and an ardent Grove fan for many years, with an idea for an article about energy. Jim was excited about his conversation...
Hollywood's Hero Deficit: The Movie Industry No Longer Aspires to Portray Genuine Heroism, Argues James Bowman, Even Though That's Precisely What Audiences Want to See
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A spate of movies about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the war on terror came out last year, all of them hostile to U.S. involvement and all of them box-office flops. At the time there was a certain amount of soul-searching...
How Are We Doing? the American Economy Is in a Rough Patch. but W. Michael Cox and Richard Alm Argue That Some Perspective Is in Order. the Long-Term Trends in the United States Are Good. and as They Demonstrate, There's a Price to Be Paid for Pessimism
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [FIGURE 1 OMITTED] When a presidential election year collides with iffy economic times, the public's view of the U.S. economy turns gloomy. Perspective shrinks in favor of short-term assessments that focus on such unpleasant...
Pictures Took!
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Modern artists have a love-hate relationship with business. Painters like Charles Sheeler saw the beauty in the fearful symmetry of modern factory design, and many more artists have embraced the fortunes which have made sharks...
Smoke and (Broken) Mirrors: According to New Research, Smoking Bans Have Led to an Increase in Drunk-Driving Fatalities
In recent years, state and local governments across America have passed I measures to outlaw smoking in bars. The public-health rationale is simple: to protect bar patrons and employees from exposure to secondhand smoke. But according to economists...
Starr Bright: C.V. Starr's Hank Greenberg on His Concerns about the Economy, What He Learned from the Military, and Iranian Leader Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Maurice R. "Hank" Greenberg is CEO of C.V. Starr & Company, a private global investment firm headquartered in Manhattan. The company was named after its founder, Cornelius Vander Starr, who also founded the insurance giant...
The Buck Starts Here: The Most Revolutionary Invention in History Is So Ingrained in Our Daily Lives That We Scarcely Consider It an Invention at All. John Steele Gordon Sketches a Short History of Money, Which Has Evolved Radically over Time and Has Made Possible the Enrichment of the World
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] One technology replaces another only when the new technology is better or cheaper (or both) than the old. When an invention reduces the price of an important part of the economic system radically enough, the result is an economic--and...
The Democrat's Dilemma: A Long-Term Shift in the Composition of the American Economy Has Transformed the Democratic Party. Joel Kotkin, a Life-Long Democrat, Explains How These Changes Pose Deep Challenges to the Party of FDR, Truman, and Bill Clinton
As they enter the fall campaign season, Democrats have numerous reasons to be optimistic, if not giddy. Their Republican opponents have become widely unpopular due to a prolonged war and a weak economy. Meanwhile the rising demographic groups in America,...
The Good News about Energy That You Don't Hear: A Deep Pessimism Surrounds Discussion of the Global Energy Industry, with Fears of Global Warming Dominating Headlines. but as ROBERT BRYCE Demonstrates, There Is a Beneficial Long-Term Energy Trend Underway. It's Called Decarbonization, and It's Getting Faster
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Peak oil and global warming are the scary topics du jour. Dozens of books and hundreds of news articles have been devoted to the two issues, and there appears to be an ongoing contest among the pundits and prognosticators...
The Growth Solution: The United States Has Moved beyond Its Era of 'Big Firm Capitalism' into an Era of 'Entrepreneurial Capitalism,' Posing Challenges and Opportunities. Economists Carl Schramm and Robert E. Litan Outline a Pro-Growth Agenda That Reflects America's New Economic Realities
Huge domestic challenges confront our next presidents (none of which is fully resolvable by a single president): ensuring greater access to and affordability of healthcare, addressing our looming entitlements crisis, making significant headway against...
The Secrets of Their Success: What Makes a Best-Selling Car? Ralph Kinney Bennett on the Most Popular Automobiles Ever
What's the best-selling car of all time? I took an informal poll recently and made it a point to ask some people who are real car buffs. I got some interesting answers. One person said 1957 Chevy. Two people guessed Ford Mustang. Another thought...
To Join the Tax-Cut Race? Reducing the Corporate Tax Rate Would Be a Simple Way to Boost U.S. Competitiveness
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Earlier this year we noted that the World Economic Forum had ranked America as the world's most competitive economy. Unfortunately, the political winds seem to be shifting in favor of policies that would make the United States...
Wal-Mart to the Rescue? as Economist Steven Horwitz Shows, the Retail Giant Played a Critical Role in Post-Katrina Relief Efforts
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Given all that went wrong with America's response to Hurricane Katrina, relatively little attention has been paid to what went right. In a new study, St. Lawrence University economist Steven Horwitz points to two underappreciated...
What Do We Know about the Uninsured? Separating Fact from Fiction, THOMAS P. MILLER Explores What We Know and What We Don't about Americans without Health Insurance
Q Just how many Americans lack health insurance? A The short answer is "too many," but the total numbers depend on whom you ask and how they measure the problem. The most commonly reported figure is from the Current Population Survey (CPS) by the...
What's in a Name? It Used to Be That Public Transactions Began with a Declaration of Identity, Which Was a Declaration of Responsibility. No Longer. Robert McHenry Wonders What We Lose in the Age of Mass Anonymity
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] What an odd dream I had last night! It is a sultry July day in Philadelphia, the kind of day one would wish to spend outdoors in the shade, with a book and a tall glass of something cooling and consoling. But despite the...
Where Credit Is Due: Stanford Economist Jonathan Levin a Began Investigating Subprime Lending in 2004. His Findings and Insights May Help the Financial Sector Avoid Mistakes in the Coming Years
When Stanford economist Jonathan Levin started studying subprime lending in 2004, he had no idea how hot the topic would become. His interest in the subject was piqued by a research proposal from an undergraduate student who had worked at a national...