The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

The American Journal of Economics and Sociology publishes scholarly essays in the social sciences, with an emphasis on the intersection of sociology and economics. Also included are book reviews and profiles of historical figures.

Articles from Vol. 63, No. 2, April

21: A Cannan Hits the Mark
Edwin Cannan (1861-1935) is best known for his 1904 edition of The Wealth of Nations, which became a standard. His next best-known work is a History of Theories of Production and Distribution, 1893. His book most relevant here is History of Local Rates...
22: Davenport: "Single Taxer of the Looser Observance"
Herbert Joseph Davenport (1861-1931) was a prominent, early twentieth-century American economist whose contributions to economic analysis include a sophisticated opportunity-cost theory and a series of lucid presentations of marginal utility theory....
23: Carver: Reluctant Demi-Georgist
In 1954, just prior to becoming a nonagenarian, Dr. Thomas Nixon Carver, who had retired from the Harvard faculty more than two decades before, began a new career as a weekly columnist for the Los Angeles Times. The vigorous and trenchant pieces that...
24: Ryan and His Domestication of Natural Law *
Monsignor John A. Ryan (1869-1945), whom James Hastings Nichols speaks of as the chief theorist of social Catholicism in America, (1) devoted the bulk of three chapters in his great work, Distributive Justice, to a critique of Henry George's so-called...
25: Alcazar's "Most Voluminous of All Assaults" (25)
In 1917 there appeared in Spain the most voluminous of all assaults upon the teaching of Henry George--a 383-page tome by Father Juan Alcazar Alvarez, bearing the appropriately ponderous title, Estudio filosofico critico del libro "Progreso y miseria,...
26: Ely: A Liberal Economist Defends Landlordism (26)
Richard T. Ely was a member of that small yet growing group of advanced economists who, even during Henry George's lifetime, advocated a substantially greater role for government in the economy. After earning his baccalaureate degree at Columbia, he...
27: Knight: Nemesis from the Chicago School
Frank Hyneman Knight (1885-1972) was one of the most influential economists of the twentieth century. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Cornell in 1916, under the guidance of Allyn A. Young. He taught at the University of Iowa, Cornell, and the...
28: Heath: Estranged Georgist
Spencer Heath (1876-1963) pioneered the theory of proprietary governance and community. He was in his initial career an engineer, inventor, and businessman, developing propellor patents and special machinery for propeller manufacture. His factory produced...
29: Hayek: "Almost Persuaded"
"It was a lay enthusiasm for Henry George which led me to economics." So wrote Friedrich August yon Hayek in a letter to Peter K. Minton in 1962. (1) Elsewhere, he explained that this enthusiasm came about as the result of his having been "exposed...
30: Hardin's Putative Critique *
Of the neo-Matthusian voices emanating from ecologist ranks, one of the most powerful and certainly the most provocative is that of Garrett Hardin (1915-2003), professor emeritus of human ecology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. I...
31: Reckoning with Rothbard
Murray Newton Rothbard (1926-1995), an economist by profession, was an active libertarian intellectual for almost fifty years, a voracious reader, prolific writer, charismatic speaker, irrepressible political activist, inspiration to myriad young libertarian...
32: LeFevre's Challenge
Robert LeFevre (1911-1986) was a leading intellectual force in the dissemination of libertarian ideas. An articulate man of great charm and elegant appearance, he possessed no formal academic credentials, having been obliged to leave college after...
33: Oser: Reservations of a Friendly Commentator
In 1974 Twayne Publishers, which six years before had brought out Edward J. Rose's biography of Henry George, issued, as part of its "Great Thinkers Series," a study of George by Jacob Oser, professor of economics at Utica College of Syracuse University...
34: Blaug: Edging toward Full Appreciation
I owe the decision to study economics to the influence of the writings of Henry George and Karl Marx. In 1944 I was 17 years old and attending Peter Stuyvesant High School in New York City. I enrolled for a course in Commerce, and in the last week...
35: Neo-Georgism
Henry George and His Critics: Where Do They Stand Today? If Henry George had created a system capable of withstanding a century of criticism in all its details, he would have been sui generis among social scientists and philosophers alike--not a...
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