The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

The American Journal of Economics and Sociology publishes scholarly essays in the social sciences, with an emphasis on the intersection of sociology and economics. Also included are book reviews and profiles of historical figures.

Articles from Vol. 69, No. 1, January

Acknowledgments
I want to thank all those who took time out of their busy lives to prepare the essays and this wonderful tribute to honor my late husband, Laurence Moss, in the way he wanted to be remembered. In alphabetical order, they are: James Ahiakpor, David...
Alfred Marshall and the Concept of Class
I Introduction THIS TEXT on the British economist Alfred Marshall's (1842-1924) concept of class is written in the memory of Laurence Moss. I have mixed feeling about this text. To write it recalls memories because the text is published in a...
Appendix III: Typical Day Sheet Prepared for Each Class
SCAMS AND FRAUDS IN BUSINESS: AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROBLEM WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ENTREPRENURIAL PROCESS I. Announcements A. Exam on Biggart, pp. 160-174 and Verdery (1995). B. The business report is due on November First bite will...
Appendix II: Syllabus on Scams and Frauds in Business, Fall 2006
SYLLABUS ECN 3631 Economics Department Babson College Professor Laurence S. Moss Westgate Building, Room 103 SCAMS AND FRAUDS IN BUSINESS: AN ECONOMIC & LEGAL ANALYSIS OF THE PROBLEM WITH SPECIAL APPLICATIONS TO THE ENTREPRENEURIAL...
Appendix I: Publications by Larry Moss
I Books A. History of Economics Mountifort Longfield: Ireland's First Professor of Political Economy; A Study of the Development of 19th-Century Economic Theory. Ottawa, IL: Green Hill Publishers, 1976. B. Law and Economics With William...
Carl Menger's Theory of Exchange
In his Principles of Economics Carl Menger presented the causal laws by which individuals alone and in association with others provide for their needs. (1) Menger offered an explanation of how basic exchange institutions are formed in response to the...
Continuing a Conversation with Larry Moss
It is not surprising that in ages of ignorance the principal instrument of a magician's arts was supposed to be his books. Books are a real magic, or rather necromancy--a person speaks from the dead, and speaking his most earnest feelings and gravest...
Cultivating Catallactics: Laurence Moss as Scholar and Mentor
With the premature passing of Laurence Moss, the field of history of economic thought has lost one of its great practitioners and mentors. Larry was not only an outstanding scholar in the field in his own right, but in his capacity as an officer in...
Equal Access to Justice for All
Larry and I worked together as volunteer members of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court's Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services for a number of years. The Pro Bono Committee was charged with the responsibility, among others, of documenting...
Evolutionary Change and Marshall's Abandoned Second Volume
Introduction In 1898, Marshall explained that in the "advanced stages of many economic problems" that is, when institutions are analyzed over long periods of time, simple equilibrium notions lose their usefulness. At this point the economist must...
Film and the Transmission of Economic Knowledge: A Report
Film is rapidly becoming in the twentieth century what the popular low-priced pamphlet was in the seventeenth century--an important and influential vehicle by which "special pleaders" (as Schumpeter called them) bring their case before the public....
Finding New Wine in Old Bottles: What Historians Must Do When Leontief Coefficients Are No Longer the Designated Drivers of Economics
I Brute Facts Antiseptically Free of Institutional Context In 1951, Nobel Laureate Wassily Leontief put his finger on what was wrong with economics. It had remained a "deductive system resting upon a static set of premises," when what was needed...
Hayek's Ricardo Effect: A Second Look
I Introduction In this article we review a long-standing controversy in twentieth-century economic thought: the debate over Hayek's Ricardo effect. Hayek developed his interpretation of the Ricardo effect in the context of his theory of business...
Hermeneutics and the Heidegger = Schumpeter Theses
In Memoriam While Larry Moss was interested in a wide range of subjects in economics and economic thought, the connection between us was through the study of Joseph Schumpeter. Together with Mark Perlman and Richard Swedberg, Larry was kind enough...
Hobbes and the Early Uses of Economic Method
Imagine all the people sharing all the world. Imagine no possessions. I wonder if you can. No need for greed or hunger, a brotherhood of man. Imagine there's no countries. It isn't hard to do. Imagine all the people living life in...
Introduction
I met Larry through a mutual friend at Babson College in 1979. Our first date was a magic performance he presented to a roomful of MIT professors. I was impressed with his intellect, quick wit, and, most of all, his great sense of humor (at times deprecating)...
Isaac Butt and the Early Development of the Marginal Utility Theory of Imputation
One of the most remarkable and hitherto unnoticed developments in nineteenth-century British thought, was Isaac Butt's (1) attempt to combine Mountifort Longfield's theory of profit (2) with the general utility teachings of Jean Baptiste Say (3) and...
Larry and the Feds
Beginning in the mid-1970s, Larry Moss began a 20-year association with federal training facilities known collectively as the Executive Seminar Centers (later the Management Development Centers), teaching market economics to federal managers attending...
Larry Moss and the Struggle against Racism by the Whately Professors of Political Economy
I Introduction SOME OF OUR memories of Laurence Moss are independent. But much of Larry's influence relates to our joint work and so it is appropriate on this occasion to remember him together. In this note, we highlight an important consideration...
Larry Moss: An Editorial Appreciation
As the editor of a journal in the history of economics, I must confess to making selfish and parochial appraisals of scholars in this field. Those I admire know the subject well, respond quickly and fully to calls to serve as referee, and are clear...
Larry Moss: One of the Good Guys in Economics
When Widdy Ho, widow of Larry Moss, invited me to contribute a short piece to this volume in remembrance of Larry Moss, I was honored, and immediately accepted. Larry was one of the good guys, and it's always sad when a good guy is taken out before...
Laurence Moss: A Remembrance
Laurence S. Moss, in addition to being one of the truly great economics journal editors with whom I have had the pleasure of working, was a scholar of tremendous reputation. His contributions to the history of economic thought covered a range of topics,...
Laurence Moss as Exceptional Professor
Good professors effectively teach you tools to solve problems confined to the classroom. Exceptional professors provide you new ways to process the world and plant seeds of knowledge that sprout outside of the classroom. Professor Moss was an exceptional...
Laurence S. Moss, 1944-2009
I Introduction SHORTLY AFTER Larry Moss's death, his widow, Widdy Ho, suggested that I write a memorial essay on Larry. My initial reaction was that I could not produce an adequate paper on Larry in a few months, especially with my worsening...
Laurence S. Moss as a Young Scholar
I first met Larry Moss in 1964, when we were both 19 years old and undergraduates at Queens College in New York City. Someone observing the circumstances of our meeting would not have been likely to predict that a 40-plus-year friendship would ensue....
Laurence Steven Moss, 1944-2009: A Biographical Sketch
I Introduction LARRY MOSS lived a full and busy life. He exuded such warmth and friendship at his numerous attendances at the History of Economics Society (HES) meetings, even after losing his vocal cords to laryngeal cancer. His sense of humor...
Mountifort Longfield's Supply-and-Demand Theory of Price and Its Place in the Development of British Economic Theory
A correct assessment of Longfield's place in the development of economic thought depends rather crucially on dismantling the myth, perpetuated by Schumpeter as well as other historians of economic thought, that Longfield was an archfoe of the labor...
On Laurence Moss: Unafraid to Say the Emperor Has No Clothes
On a Thursday evening in late 1990, a man carrying what looked like a giant book walked in the room reserved for the Kress Seminar at the Economics Department of Harvard University and made his way to the podium. He placed his heavy load on the table,...
Optimal Jurisdictions and the Economic Theory of the State: Or, Anarchy and One-World Government Are Only Corner Solutions
As I see it, a genuinely economic theory of the nation state must satisfy at least two criteria: (1) it has to explain why a community of self-seeking individuals is better off with certain forms of decision-making centralized rather than dispersed,...
Playing Fast and Loose with the Facts about the Writings of Malthus and the Classical School
Sometime after the Second World War ended and the Cold War heated up, the fields of growth and development came of age. The efforts of the United States to help rebuild Europe, as well as the long list of third-world ethnic groups battling to emerge...
Price Theory and the Study of Deception in the Exchange Process
Introduction It is elementary to point out that in a voluntary exchange the parties to that exchange expect to gain, and that is what motivates the exchange activity in the first place. I shall refer to this as the "fundamental theorem" of economic...
Remembering Larry Moss
When I attended the special session organized by Bob Dimand and Steven Medema to memorialize Larry Moss at the History of Economics Society meeting in Denver, Colorado on Monday, June 28, 2009, I realized that while I had known Larry well for a few...
Ricardian Economics: Reasoning about Counterintuitive Tendencies When System Constraints Are Present
Introduction I do not think that science is "refined common sense." I especially do not think economic science is so organized because many of its patterns of thought are counterintuitive. David Ricardo's formulation of several organizing principles...
Richard Whately and the Gospel of Transparency
I Introduction IN THE DIVISION OF LABOR, people trade goods and services for ideas from specialists. But if they hire someone to think for them, how do they avoid being exploited? A hundred years before Frank Knight (1935: 304) struggled with...
The Case for Economic Reasoning in MBA Education Revisited
I Introduction LARRY WAS a wonderful scholar and an avid learner with an insatiable intellectual curiosity. He loved engaging dialogue, regardless of topic, and his passion for learning and new discoveries came before anything. Larry became...
The Chicago Intellectual Property Rights Tradition and the Reconciliation of Coase and Hayek
In this paper I trace a fairly continuous line of argument about the institutional mechanisms by which intellectual property is produced and maintained in an advanced, commercial economy. (1) The better part of the economic thinking on this subject...
The Henry George Theorem and the Entrepreneurial Process: Turning Henry George on His Head
I Introduction There is hardly a major real estate developer who does not understand the basic mechanisms of the Henry George Theorem (HGT). Even the real estate brokers who earn commissions know that when it comes to valuing some parcel of land,...
The Preaching Must Never Stop: Remembering Larry Moss
In 1988, Sandra Peart was a graduate student who worked at that year's meeting of the History of Economics Society in Toronto. Twenty years later she reflected on that conference in her presidential address to the same group: "I spent most of my time...
The Seligman-Edgeworth Debate about the Analysis of Tax Incidence: The Advent of Mathematical Economics, 1892-1910
This debate took place over eighteen years in a series of publications that I shall chronicle below, starting with Edwin Robert Anderson Seligman's On the Shifting and Incidence of Taxation (SIT) in 1892, and ending sometime after 1910 with the appearance...
Thomas Hobbes's Influence on David Hume: The Emergence of a Public Choice Tradition
In an article that appeared in this journal more than a decade ago, I named the seventeenth-century philosopher Thomas Hobbes a pioneer-founder of "public choice economics." (1) Both Hobbes and contemporary public-choice theorists are interested in...
Working with Larry Moss and Marjorie Grice-Hutchinson
I came to know Larry Moss as a result of teaching the 1988 winter/ spring term at Babson College. Larry was a congenial colleague: we exchanged our published theses, visited one of his favorite booksellers, and discussed our common interests in the...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.