The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

The American Journal of Economics and Sociology publishes scholarly essays in the social sciences, with an emphasis on the intersection of sociology and economics. Also included are book reviews and profiles of historical figures.

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 5, November

Corruption's Effect on Business Venturing within the United States
I Introduction As REGARDS CORRUPTION, (1) there seems to be two countrywide equilibria. Developing countries seem caught in a world with poor institutions and much corruption, while developed countries have better institutions and less corruption...
Henry George under the Microscope: Comments on "Henry George's Political Critics"
"Henry George's Political Critics" by Prof. Michael Hudson is the first and longest article in the January 2008 supplement to the American Journal of Economics and Sociology. However, Professor Hudson's article fails to do what it seems intended to...
Paradigms and Novelty in Economics: The History of Economic Thought as a Source of Enlightenment
The development of the discipline of economics might best be understood by using the concept of paradigm. Indeed, Richard Schmalensee (1991: 115-116) has done this when, building on Thomas Kuhn's ideas of normal science and paradigm shifts, he speculated...
Smith and Living Wages: Arguments in Support of a Mandated Living Wage
The distribution of income, the level of wages, and other factors affecting living standards are among the most important topics of discussion, not only in the United States during the current election cycle but also throughout the world. Of further...
The Market, the Firm, and the Economics Profession
I Introduction THE GROWING MATHEMATICAL and statistical sophistication of academic economic research is undeniable. Coelho and McClure (2005) and Grubel and Boland (1986) provide evidence of increasing sophistication, if any is needed, through...
Too Much Competition in Higher Education? Some Conceptual Remarks on the Excessive-Signaling Hypothesis
I Introduction: The Business of Attracting Students WITHIN THE ECONOMICS of higher education, there is a small but influential literature that examines the outcomes of competitive processes on markets for higher educational services. In a series...

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