Biography

Founded in Jan. of 1978, Biography is a quarterly journal published by the University of Hawaii Press. Its subject matter is literature. Stanley Schab is the Managing Editor, George Simson is the Founding Editor, Marie-Jose Fassiotto is the Reviewed Elsewhere Editor and Miriam Fuchs and Craig Howes are the Co-Editors.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 1, Winter

Autobiography and the Autobiographical in the Bill Douglas Trilogy
Bill Douglas's death in 1991 was followed by a book of essays, scripts, and biographical accounts: Bill Douglas: A Lanternist's Approach. There has been some, but limited, subsequent critical interest. Where he is known, it is mostly likely to be through...
Carousel: Erwin, Elvira, Armin, Fassbinder, and All the Others' Auto/biographies
In 1978, Rainer Werner Fassbinder wrote, produced, directed, designed, photographed, and edited In a Year of Thirteen Moons. He was thirty-three years old, and this was his thirty-fourth feature film. Then, and even more commonly after his premature...
Keaton's Leap: Self-Projection and Autobiography in Film
In the 1924 comedy Sherlock, Jr., the director and actor Buster Keaton plays a young movie projectionist who falls asleep on the job and dreams that he enters the film he is projecting. The film audience within the film and the audience of Sherlock,...
Lovers, Filmmakers, and Nazis: Fritz Lang's Last Two Movies as Autobiography
In the 1930s, the filmmaker Fritz Lang fled Nazi Germany and remade himself into one of the most successful Hollywood directors, producing hit films for two decades. Then he did something unusual: he went back to Germany to make two peculiar movies,...
Playing Doctor: Francois Truffaut's L'Enfant Sauvage and the Auteur/autobiographer as Impersonator
The film of tomorrow appears to me as even more personal than an individual and autobiographical novel, like a confession, or a diary. The young filmmakers will express themselves in the first person and will relate what has happened to them. --Francois...
Removing the Experience: Simulacrum as an Autobiographical Act in American Splendor
The theme was an unlikely love story between a man and his medium, which in this case is a comic book, and how he got a life through comic books. --Robert Pulcini, co-director, American Splendor (West et al. 41) ... the simulacrum implies huge dimensions,...
The Immigrant Experience in Jonas Mekas's Diary Films: A Chronotopic Analysis of Lost, Lost, Lost
Jonas Mekas, who emigrated from Lithuania to the United States in 1949, became a leading figure in the American independent cinema and a prominent film diarist, helping to establish this practice as a legitimate audiovisual form. In this article, I...
The Influence and Treatment of Autobiography in Confessional Art: Observations on Tracey Emin's Feature Film Top Spot
Tracey Emin is no stranger to speaking the unspeakable and extending the boundaries of traditional representation. Her inspiration comes from undisguised autobiographical experience, and as she recreates the intimacies of her own life in her work,...
The Mandatory Proxy
For responsibility is the extreme of subissement: it is that for which I must answer when I am without any answer and without any self save a borrowed, a simulated self, or the "stand-in" for identity: the mandatory proxy. --Maurice Blanchot, The...
The Personal Cinema of Maya Deren: Meshes of the Afternoon and Its Critical Reception in the History of the Avant-Garde
Maya Deren's Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) could be said to exemplify Teresa de Lauretis's idea of "the really avant-garde work in cinema and in feminism," which "is narrative and Oedipal with a vengeance, since it seeks to stress the duplicity of...
To Act or to Perform: Distinguishing Filmic Autobiography
In the May 9, 1957, issue of Arts, three years after the publication of "Une certaine tendance du cinema francais," his manifesto on cinema d'auteurs, Francois Truffaut prophetically declared: "Le film de demain m'apparait donc plus personnel encore...
Vitagraphic Time
Hence the division of western cinema into European humanism and American science fiction. --Gilles Deleuze (17) (1) Life, mutation, biography. Vitagraph, Mutoscope, Biograph: those patent wars among the early American movie companies may seem...