Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers

Publication covering women and literature.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2, June

"Across the Gulf": Working in the "Post-Recovery" Era
What do critics mean when they use the phrase post-recovery? It is a paradoxical term in many ways--valid, because we have moved so far beyond the simple recovery of forgotten or understudied women writers to asking far more critically challenging...
Editor's Note
The twenty-five years since Legacy's founding can be measured in statistics: The journal comprises more than fifty issues, printed by four different presses, prepared by seven editors and a dozen or so editorial associates, aided by countless graduate...
Embodied Pedagogies: Femininity, Diversity, and Community in Anthologies of Women's Writing, 1836-2009
With the production of several new collections of American women's writing, a timely moment has arrived to appraise the more than 150-year history of such projects and, in particular, to inquire how that history may have informed new work. The revolution...
Introduction
Joanne Dobson is a founding editor of Legacy, with Martha Ackmann and Karen Dandurand. Throughout her academic career, in which she has taught at Fordham University, Amherst College, and Tufts University, she has dedicated herself to recovering nineteenth-century...
Laying Claim to the Land(scape): Chansonetta Stanley Emmons (1858-1937)
In 1979, when the Franklin Library republished Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed. Firs and Other Stories in its collection of the 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature, it illustrated the leather-bound limited edition with images...
Legacy Profiles Index: Volumes 1.1 through 25.2, 1984-June 2009
Barr, Amelia E., by Rose Norman, 16.2 (1999): 193-200. Blake, Lillie Devereux, by Grace Farrell, 14.2 (1997): 146-53. Bowers, Bathsheba, by Suzanne M. Zweizig, 11.1 (1994): 65-73. With an excerpt from An Alarm Sounded to Prepare The Inhabitants...
Looking Back, Looking Forward: Two Legacy Roundtable Discussions
In celebration of Legacy's twenty-fifth anniversary, we invited a number of scholars who have been important supporters of the journal to participate in a conversation about its past, present, and future. A central aim of Legacy has always been to...
Of Compass Bearings and Reorientations in the Study of American Women Writers
In 1816 and 1817, two Boston publishers brought out second editions of a pamphlet titled A Narrative of the Shipwreck and Unparalleled Sufferings of Mrs. Sarah Allen, (late of Boston) on her Passage in May Last from New-York to New Orleans. Ostensibly...
On Legacy Profiles
Profiles are central to Legacy's identity and mission. Although they are much shorter than regular scholarly essays and do not appear in every issue, they remain one of the journal's most unique and important features. The original intent of the Profiles...
Recovering Recovery: Early American Women and Legacy's Future
Legacy's identity throughout its twenty-five years has been intertwined with its commitment to recovery work. Features like Profiles, Reprints, and From the Archives have brought recovered authors to readers' attention, in turn sparking new scholarship...
"The Flower Charity. Heaven Bless It!": A Study of Charity in Literature and Culture
At a crucial point in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's story "The Lady of Shalott," the impoverished seamstress Sary Jane brings her invalid sister a bouquet containing blossoms, probably lilies-of-the-valley, that the sister sees as "silver bells." How,...
The Responsibility Is Ours: The Failure of Infrastructure and the Limits of Scholarship
For much of the past two years, I have been leading a double life, working on two archival projects--one electronic and one print. I've been splitting my time and my attention between two of the most well-known writers of U.S. literature: Walt Whitman,...