Behind the Headlines

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 2, December-March

Development Odyssey Re-Visited: How CIDA Evolved: The Canadian International Development Agency Is Responsible for ... Canada's Foreign Aid
According to Cranford Pratt (Behind the Headlines, July-September 1998), my commentary on the past and future of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) was not only spirited but `occasionally combative.' Coming as it does from a master...
Human Security: Not Long Ago, the Security of the State Was Considered the Greatest Good ... but That Was before Civil Wars Became Profuse
The components of human security are not new. Victimization and impunity are as old as time. Infectious diseases are as old as the plague. Civil wars date from the Treaty of Westphalia, at least. With Woodrow Wilson's 14 Points, principle had begun,...
Independent Partners: Canada, the USA, and the World: In Both Domestic and International Affairs, the Significance of the 49th Parallel Endures
The 1998 CIIA Foreign Policy Conference was situated at the confluence of three themes: social and psychological influences on Canada's international behaviour; the state of relations between Canada and the United States; and what the two countries...
Leadership Succession at CIIA Headquarters
Reflecting the other day on my experiences over four years as President and CEO of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs (CIIA), my principle reaction was one of enjoyment. I enjoyed working with all of my colleagues at our Toronto headquarters....
Markets, Power and Justice: Notes on the World Political Economy in Transition
One thing is clear at the dawn of the 21st century - markets rule. They now serve as the primary distributive mechanism across an enormous range of human endeavour. Most of what used to be referred to as the second and much of the third worlds have,...
Polar Conversations: Defining a Democratic Northern Foreign Policy: ... Where Once the DEW Line Stood ... a New Challenge Has Come
In the Arctic, appearances can deceive. One may walk for weeks and not encounter another soul, on a landscape apparently untouched by humans. But a visitor might also perceive the traces of long habitation if she met Inuit with a deep knowledge of...
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