The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology

Published by the Canadian Sociological Association, The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology is a quarterly journal publishing scholarly articles in the fields of sociology and anthropology.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 3, August

A Break from the Past: Impacts and Implications of the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Canada Research Chairs Initiatives *
IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS, there has been a veritable flurry of federal government activity related to university research. Some of the more significant developments include the establishment of the Tri-Council Code of Research Ethics, the conversion...
A Conversation on the Future of the Academy with James Turk, PhD, Executive Director, Canadian Association of University Teachers
Karen Grant: I'd like you to start off reflecting on what are the key issues facing the academy right now. Jim Turk: One is the serious underfunding of the academy, which has a variety of direct and indirect consequences. The number of faculty...
The Academy in the 21st Century Editors' Introduction
AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY, universities were just beginning to emerge as state institutions. Academic self-governance was in its infancy, and funding for universities was mainly in the form of government grants, along with some private contributions...
The Bog-Like Ground on Which We Tread: Arbitrating Academic Freedom in Canada *
ACADEMIC FREEDOM IS "the key legitimating concept of the university" (Menand, 1996: 4); yet, its future is far from secure. By its very nature, academic freedom is a threat to those who hold power; just as surely, its liberty is valued most by those...
Which Barbarians at the Gates? from the Culture Wars to Market Orthodoxy in the North American Academy
THE CULTURE WARS THAT RAGED in the North American academy for much of the 1990s seem but a distant memory now. Regardless of occasional attempts to rehash old grudges and revisit tired accusations, most academics have licked their wounds, buried...