Victorian Poetry

Journal publishing scholary articles on topics related to Victorian poetry and poets.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 2, Summer

A Reflection on Fiction and Art in "The Lady of Shalott". (Brief Article)
In line 114 of "The Lady of Shalott" (1842) we are told "Out flew the web and floated wide." Tennyson's references to space and spatial relations are sometimes subtle, but prove highly significant for new interpretations of even his best-loved and...
Confusing the Issue? A.C. Bradley's Theory of Poetry and Its Contexts
THE IMPORTANCE OF A. C. BRADLEY IN THE EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH studies has often been noted. As Professor of Poetry at Oxford from 1901 to 1906, his support for the literary teachers in the English School, at a time when linguistic interests were...
"I Make the Whole World Answer to My Art": Alice Meynell's Poetic Identity
IN "A POET OF ONE MOOD," LATE-VICTORIAN POET ALICE MEYNELL DESCRIBES herself as a poet of "wild ways" who commands the world's attention with poetry that emanates from "One thought that is the treasure of my years...And in mine arms, clasped, like...
Patmore, Pascal, and Astronomy
IN THE VICTORIES OF LOVE, WRITTEN THREE YEARS BEFORE PATMORE'S 1864 conversion to Catholicism in Rome, extended astronomical metaphors begin to appear with such frequency in his poetry that one might consider the later Patmore a rival of Tennyson as...
Professor Jerome Hamilton Buckley
A youthful, endearingly gangly Professor Jerome Buckley presided over a graduate seminar I took at Columbia in the mid fifties. Like scores of his other students, I attribute the subsequent direction of my career as a Victorianist to Jerry's mentoring....
The Lost Pamphlet Version of D.G. Rossetti's "The Stealthy School of Criticism"
IN OCTOBER OF 1871, STUNG TO ANGER BY ROBERT BUCHANAN'S HARSHLY critical essay "The Fleshly School of Poetry," Dante Gabriel Rossetti began writing a vitriolic response. The first three weeks of the month had been spent uncovering the identity of Buchanan,...
"Unhackneyed Thoughts and Winged Words": Arnold, Locke, and the Similes of Sohrab and Rustum
But hardly have we, for one little hour, Been on our own line, have we been ourselves-- Hardly had skill to utter one of all The nameless feelings that course through our breast, But they course on for ever unexpressed. --Arnold, "The...
War of the Winds: Shelley, Hardy, and Harold Bloom
CENTRAL TO THE EFFORTS OF SOME MAJOR HARDY CRITICS TO PROMOTE THEIR varied theoretical agendas in recent decades has been a shared emphasis on the affinities and influence linking the poetry of Percy Shelley to that of Thomas Hardy. Poet-critic Joseph...