The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 277, No. 3, July 21

American Rebels. (Articles)
During much of the 1960s I kept an antiwar poster on my wall with a quotation from Albert Camus that read, "I would like to be able to love my country, and justice too." The following essays, which will appear in book form later this year, attempt...
Bella Abzug: She Couldn't Type. What She Could Do Was Beat the Boys on Their Own Turf. (Articles)
"I've been described as a tough noisy woman--a prizefighter--a man-hater... a Jewish mother with more complaints than Portnoy. There are those who say I'm impatient, impetuous, uppity, rude, profane, brash, and overbearing. Whether I'm any of these...
Benjamin Mays: As the 'Schoolmaster of the Movement,' He Shaped Generations of Men. (Articles)
Benjamin Elijah Mays--devout Christian minister, uncompromising advocate for justice, career educator and longtime president of Morehouse College in Atlanta--was called the "Schoolmaster of the [civil rights] Movement" by the historian Lerone Bennett...
Billionaires for Bush. (Editorials)
I believe in the division of labor. You send us to Congress; we pass laws under which you make money...and out of your profits, you further contribute to our campaign funds to send us back again to pass more laws to enable you to make more money. ...
Bob Moses: His Technique Is to Be a Catalyst in People's Efforts to Free Themselves. (Articles)
Late one night in October 1961, I flew from Atlanta to Jackson, Mississippi, with Bob Moses. We didn't sit together during the silent one-hour flight, nor did we make eye contact at the empty airport. Not that it wasn't legal. You simply wouldn't take...
Canada: Hippie Nation?
Canadians can't quite believe it: Suddenly, we're interesting. After months of making the news only with our various communicable diseases--SARS, mad cow and West Nile--we're now getting world famous for our cutting-edge laws on gay marriage and...
Court-Watching. (Comment)
Nation readers should be excused for wondering whether they were in some sort of time warp as the Supreme Court closed its term with a slew of decisions that recalled the halcyon days of Chief Justice Earl Warren. In a single week, the Court upheld...
Dems-Why Not Woo the Young? (Comment)
Since 1968 the Democrats have been shut out, more or less, as majority party. But with a small bump in left-of-center turnout, they'd be running the country. The dropoff in voting has been greatest among the young. This is the biggest what-if in American...
Dorothy Day: She Went from Cutting Religion out of Her Life to Making It the Core. (Articles)
In the final days of Rudy Giuliani's term as mayor of New York, three months after the heroism of 9/11, he quietly approved a politically wired project to build twenty-five multimillion-dollar mansions on Staten Island. An expediter for the project's...
I.F. Stone: He Saw What Others Missed, Even Though It Was Often in Plain Sight. (Articles)
Sidney Hook, the Marxist philosopher-turned-neoconservative who once mistakenly listed I.F. Stone among those who had defended the Moscow purge trials, wrote a book called The Hero in History. In it he distinguished between eventful men (like the Dutch...
Letters
LET'S HEAR IT FOR ATCA! Washington, DC * Daphne Eviatar's otherwise excellent article on the lawsuits against Unocal, which seek to hold the company liable for human rights abuses committed as part of its operations in Burma ["Profits at Gunpoint,"...
Margaret Sanger: She Believed Reproductive Rights Could Change History without Class War. (Articles)
"No Gods, No Masters," the rallying cry of the Industrial Workers of the World, was her personal and political manifesto. Emma Goldman and Bill Haywood, Mabel Dodge and John Reed, were her earliest mentors and comrades. Allied with labor radicals and...
Miles Davis: He Was a Hero Descending, Never Flinching from the Experience. (Articles)
Most of what we know about the life of Miles Davis is either anecdotal or a matter of official record, and thus not absolutely reliable; but by all accounts, most pertinently his own, Miles Davis was a bad man. Live-Evil. Bitches Brew. Dark Magus....
Paul Wellstone: He Took Pride Both in Principled Obstinacy and in Gains Born of Alliances. (Articles)
When Paul Wellstone perished in a plane crash along with his wife, his daughter and three members of his staff in October 2002, the horror of his death nearly overshadowed the meaning of his life. His devoted supporters, including his two surviving...
Queer Cheer. (Comment)
The Supreme Court's sweeping June 26 ruling in Lawrence v. Texas came almost seventeen years to the day after one of the darkest moments in the history of the gay movement. The Court's 5-to-4 decision, in 1986, on Bowers v. Hardwick was so rife with...
Saddam Mystery Solved. (Comment)
Top intelligence experts now believe beret-fancying Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein died of complications from swallowing his mustache during a US missile attack on his Baghdad bunker in March, but has since been stuffed, mounted on wheels and trundled...
The Enemy Within
Snoozing guards at Los Alamos, missing vials of plutonium oxide... Yes, the headlines in late June were announcing "security lapses" again at national labs and nuclear weapons plants. It seems that an Al Qaeda terrorist could roll up to the gates of...
The Girls of Summer
Legally Blonde 2 * Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle This Independence Day, the symbolic struggle being waged on thousands of screens across the Empire pits Reese Witherspoon against Arnold Schwarzenegger, gooey-sweet girl against impassive (but protective)...
Walt Whitman: He Was a Liberator of People and Culture, Using a Liberated Poetic Form. (Articles)
In 1848, 29-year-old Walt Whitman was for three months a reporter for the Daily Crescent in New Orleans, writing fluff pieces about local color and charm as seen through Yankee eyes. But he also saw darker spectacles there--streetside auctions of slaves--and...
WMD: Who Knew What? (Comment)
"Intelligence is an art, not a science," says Deputy Defense Secretary Wolfowitz. Secretary of State Powell observes, "There are always debates about intelligence subjects. You get information in, and there are debates." Gen. Richard Myers, Chairman...
Woody Guthrie: He Succeeded Not by Toeing the Line but by Trusting His Talent and Vision. (Articles)
When Bob Dylan took the stage at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, all leather and Ray-Bans and Beatle boots, and declared emphatically and (heaven forbid) electrically that he wasn't "gonna work on Maggie's farm no more," the folk music faithful took...