The Nation

The Nation is a weekly magazine published by the Nation Institute. First published in 1865, The Nation is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It is the oldest weekly magazine in the U.S. to be continually published. The Nation also has bureaus in London and South Africa.Self-described as "the flagship for the left," The Nation focuses on the topics of politics and culture. Contributors of note have included Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Gore Vidal, Christopher Hitchens, Hunter S. Thompson, Langston Hughes, Ralph Nader, Leon Trotsky, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John Steinbeck, John Maynard Keynes and Naomi Klein. The Nation has broken such notable stories as the Valerie Plane leak scandal in 2003 and several articles about the Whitewater scandal in the 1990s. It was the first U.S. publication to report on what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion. The Nation has won 24 National Magazine Awards since 1971. Katrina vanden Heuvel is Editor and Publisher. Roane Carey is Managing Editor, John Palattella is Literary Editor, Betsy Reed is Executive Editor, and Richard Lingeman and Richard Kim are Senior Editors.

Articles from Vol. 270, No. 11, March 20

8,500 Years of Lead - 79 Years of Leaded Gasoline
BC: 6500 BC. Lead discovered in Turkey. 3000 BC. First significant production of lead. 500 BC-300 AD. Roman lead smelting produces dangerous emissions. 100 BC. Greek physicians give clinical description of lead poisoning. 1800s: 1854....
AFL-CIO Goes Global
Seattle changed many things, and one of them is American labor. Nothing lifts the spirit or one's vision like winning. Rank-and-file members returned home exhilarated by their victory, and so did their leaders. AFL-CIO president John Sweeney, already...
Cemetery Road
Progressives are really grasping at straws these days. First we're supposed to get excited because Ralph Nader is running for President as a Green. This is the man who made common cause over NAFTA with the racist bigot and Holocaust denier Pat Buchanan-imagine...
Classified
While we reserve the right to edit, reject or reclassify any advertisement, The Nation wishes its readers to know we don't have the facilities to check the promises made by our advertisers, and we have a strong presumption against censoring any advertisement,...
Ethyl and the Nazis
Working double time to craft their own heroic mythology, the makers of tetraethyl lead take much pride in their contribution to the Allied effort in World War II. According to a 1988 Associated Octel history, TEL was "'the magic bullet' [that] gave...
Ethyl-Octel Family Tree
The Ethyl Gasoline Corporation, a joint venture of GM and Standard Oil, founded Ethyl Export in England in 1930 to handle foreign business. Additional outposts were opened in Italy, France and Germany, and in 1938 Ethyl Export became the Associated...
Just an Oversight
In the late nineteenth century, Cecil Rhodes proposed a world system based on an Anglo-Saxon and English-speaking condominium. The white territories of England, Canada, Australia and New Zealand would be the apexes, and the United States would by this...
Labor's About-Face
In February the AFL-CIO took a big step toward its progressive roots, embracing the immigrants whose energy and radicalism have contributed to its best traditions. The federation's executive council voted to call for the repeal of employer sanctions,...
Lead Kills Cars, Too
While they were busy glossing over its perilous shortcomings for the public health, tetraethyl lead's boosters almost forgot that their "gift of God" posed some serious problems for cars. Instead of benefitting, engines were getting destroyed by lead...
Letters
not only in dixie New York City In his excellent "Rebel Yell" [Feb. 14], Eric Foner rightly points out that the display of the Confederate flag over the South Carolina state Capitol has "more to do with the 1960s than the 1860s." The flag went...
Not Guilty?
The February 25 acquittal of the four white New York City police officers who shot Amadou Diallo, an unarmed West African immigrant, came as a profound shock to many. Ever since the shooting more than a year ago in the Bronx, it has been a national...
On Leo, Gio and Tobey
WONDER BOYS * BOILER ROOM It's a sign of age: Mention 1985, and I will sometimes think you're talking about last year. Maybe you, too, occasionally place your foot on a chronological step that isn't there-in which case, you will have to grab for...
Shoddy Science
There were two basic scientific tasks for Robert Kehoe and later grantees favored by the lead additive makers: First, argue that human- body lead burdens in industrialized, ethylized America, measured by the amount of lead in blood or urine, are not...
The Hall of Fame
SOUNDING THE EARLY WARNING ON TEL Yandell Henderson. 1873-1944. Chairman, Medical Research Board, US Aviation Service WW1, consultant, Bureau of Mines. Supervised hundreds of poison-gas experiments, developed first Army gas mask, which he personally...
The Hall of Shame
THE ENGINEER Charles "Boss" Kettering. 1876-1958. Inventor of electric self-starter, later head of General Motors' research division; major GM shareholder. Popular public speaker ("The greatest salesman of science this country has ever known"-Time),...
The Lead Files
On November 26, 1924, The Nation reported on the deaths of five workers at a Standard Oil plant in New Jersey who had been exposed to deadly poisonous tetraethyl lead, which the company was manufacturing as an additive to gasoline to increase its power...
The Secret History of Lead
The next time you pull the family barge in for a fill-up, check it out: The gas pumps read "Unleaded." You might reasonably suppose this is because naturally occurring lead has been thoughtfully removed from the gasoline. But you would be wrong. There...
Wedge and Chaos
For years, Republicans practiced wedge politics, trying to separate voters from the Democratic Party by pushing divisive social issues (busing, immigration, gay rights). This presidential campaign, John McCain initiated his own version of intraparty...
We Visit Octel
"Do you see that village over there?" Bob Larbey asked, pointing out the minicab window. "That's where Louise Woodward grew up. That's where she lives." It was quite an admission. You see, Larbey was the soon-to-retire manager of external affairs...